Harry

How one's financial life divides up in Canada

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johankok

Is there perhaps someone with recent SA / Toronto comparisons?

e.g. R 20K / per month = approx. CAD xx per month (obviously something like that will also depend on lifestyle).

I'd like to know the similar for Alberta as well.

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miena

Not a full answer but helpfull...

World's Most Expensive Cups Of Coffee

Zack O'Malley Greenburg 07.24.08, 12:01 AM ET

Vladimir Ilyich Lenin must be rolling over in his grave. Just 17 years after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the one-time capital of communism is now home to the world's most expensive cup of coffee. The average cup of joe in Moscow is $10.19, including service, according to a new survey by the London office of U.S. consulting firm Mercer.

The rest of Europe isn't much kinder--coffee is $6.77 in Paris and $6.62 in Athens. International travelers looking to satisfy their caffeine cravings should look to South America and Africa for relief: At $2.03 per cup in Buenos Aires and $2.36 in Johannesburg, both continents offer relief to cash-strapped java seekers. New York is far from the most expensive, weighing in at a mere $3.75.

"The cost of living survey is conducted in stores of international standard, frequented by expatriates," says Nathalie Constantin Métral, a research manager at Mercer's office in Geneva, Switzerland. "We collected the price for a cup of coffee in bars and cafés of international standard frequented by expatriates in Moscow, and those places are very expensive."

The figures are a part of Mercer's annual cost of living survey, which covers 143 cities across six continents and measures the relative cost of more than 200 items in each location, including housing, transportation, food, clothing, household goods and entertainment. The results are used to help government agencies and multinational companies determine compensation allowances when sending employees abroad.

They better up the budget for Moscow trips, if they haven't already. Along with that $10 cup of coffee, an international newspaper clocks in at $6. So along with something to eat, even a modest-spending business traveler has racked up more than $20 in expenses from waking up and starting the day just as he or she would at home.

In addition to purveying the world's most ruinous roast, Moscow topped Mercer's overall cost of living index for the third year in a row, finishing ahead of Tokyo and London. The average monthly rent on a two-bedroom luxury apartment in Moscow costs $4,500. (In Tokyo, where space is at a premium, the apartment rent averages out to $5,128.84 ... but the coffee there is only five bucks, not 10, and the morning paper will only run you $1.40).

Though it can feel expensive at times, New York isn't even among the top 20 most expensive cities, according to Mercer. This year the Big Apple slipped from No. 15 to No. 22 on the list, and is the only American city in the top 50.

What's the most you've ever paid for a single cup of coffee? Share your experiences in the Reader Comments section below.

Coffee isn't the only everyday commodity that will cost U.S. citizens abroad. A ride on London's tube costs $5.89, the highest mass transit cost of any city on Mercer's list. If you want to buy a CD, don't go to Prague--unless you want to dish out $33.53, on average. Americans traveling to Dublin might want to go on a vegetarian diet--the average burger is $10.12, nearly twice as much as Moscow's $5.75.

Moscow's prices continue to rise across the board, but there is some relief in sight for coffee drinkers. Last year, beleaguered Starbucks (nasdaq: SBUX - news - people ) opened its first location in the Russian capital following a victory in a lengthy dispute with a Russian patent squatter. Muscovites complained about the prices from the get-go, but Starbucks' brew is actually lighter on the wallet than most. According to The Moscow News, the company's notorious lattes ranged in price from 150 to 200 rubles, or $6.42 to $8.56 at today's exchange rates.

Here is the link...http://www.mercer.com/costofliving

also noteworthy....

Toronto 54th and...

The lowest ranking city from Europe, Middle East & Africa was Johannesburg, South Africa (140th)

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JanSalJanNat

@Harry would you recommend a newcomer not buy a house for the first year/ years in order to save up a deposit as much as possible?  We bought a house in SA, which we will be selling before we leave, and it's really sad to see how much of our bond we pay on interest.  The interest rate is not that high in Canada but it seems there's a lot of extra's that you need to consider.

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Tracey22

Everybody has an experience in buying houses that range from getting one before you arrive to not buying one at all.  I have a friend who does not believe in home ownership, and has rented the same home for 25 years.

We rented for the first 6 months of being here.  this helped us decide what area we wanted to live in.  The difference a deposit makes on buying house is whether or not you have to pay for mortgage insurance, and at what rate.  the cost of mortgage insurance ca be found on CMHC, Genworth or Canada Guarantee's website.

properties in GTA, GVA are priced way above the national average.  So the decision to buy really depends on where you want to live, and whether you buy into the mass belief that property ownership produces wealth.

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M-N
On 2018-01-10 at 4:44 AM, JanSalJanNat said:

@Harry would you recommend a newcomer not buy a house for the first year/ years in order to save up a deposit as much as possible?  We bought a house in SA, which we will be selling before we leave, and it's really sad to see how much of our bond we pay on interest.  The interest rate is not that high in Canada but it seems there's a lot of extra's that you need to consider.

I usually recommend waiting. 

1. If you're not used to Canadian winters it's easier to live in a condo if you are able to.  You don't have to do any winterizing and it gives you time to get used to winter and learn the ins and outs.  Owning a home in Canada is a bit different than owning one in SA.  

2. If you're in a new city you may want to first get to know the city before choosing a suburb. You may decide you like the idea of living close to downtown and end up hating it. So decide what you like and rent first. 

3.  Mortgage rules have changed from this year meaning they will now do a stress test to see if you can afford a mortgage. Here an Article explaining what it's about. Basically  even if you qualify for 600k the stress test may put you at 500k.  

We rented a condo for about a year and ended up buying in the opposite end of the city, lol.  

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JanSalJanNat

Great advice, thanx @M-N

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