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Harry

RAAI-RAAI Rides Again!

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Harry

Adele,

much "warmer" than the Yukon...but still "no cigar!"

The Labrador stuff happened later:

"As early as 1592 an English sea captain reported sighting 60 Basque fishing ships in Placentia Harbour. After the Basque came the French who, in 1662 decided to include Newfoundland in its western empire because of the rich fishing waters."

SO, I have just given you another clue...OKAY!!??

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Rochelle

Well, if it's not Yukon, or Newfoundland ... then it must be Nova Scotia!!

Looks like Fort Anne! Fort Anne is Canada's oldest national historic site. It was declared a Dominion park in 1917. The Scots built the first fort on the site in 1629 and the French later followed with four forts. These forts changed hands several times through the continuous rivalry between the French and the English. In 1935 the Officers' Quarters, originally constructed in 1797 were extensively rebuilt to form the museum in Harry's picture.

Both imperial powers considered the conquest of this fortified site as the key to domination of the part of eastern Canada known by the French as "Acadie" and by the British as "Nova Scotia."

The town is currently called Annapolis Royal.

The are was first occupied by the Acadians, who was expelled from their homeland by the British.

The town was previously called Port Royal, but renamed in honour of Queen Anne.

That's it!

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Harry

There ya go!...Rochelle's got it!

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Matisse
One of the few areas of Canada with, what I would call, "real history"

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

And when Harry refers to an area with "real history" in Canada, the chances are very good that the Acadians were somewhere involved in that history. :P

In this aerial photograph of Fort Anne one can clearly see the shape of the embankments, which reminds one quite a bit of the similar shape of the castle in Cape Town.

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Harry

Matisse,

in the 17th century many fortifications were built as "five-pointed- castles".

As for "real" history...I don't find "How the West was Won", Cowboy Stories and how BC became a place after Pretoria was started to be "real history" in the same sense as

1. The discovery of the Sea Route to India

2. The discovery of America

3. The retaking of Spain from the Arabs

or even the Battle of Trafalgar

What folks call "history" here out west, happened in my grandfather's and great-grandfather's time....that borders on the hilarious. I find it difficult to to be awestruck by wooden buildings over here that my owm mother might have been born in. The folks over here in the west do not HAVE history! They expect me to get excited about a railway line!! Sheesh!:P:(

In the East of the country there is "real history"....stuff that really changed the course of the future, complete with battles and high drama. That's where we ddefeated the USA, after all! ;)

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shaun

RAAI-RAAI 138

Long time since someone posted here!!!

Where and what is this?

Sorry.... no clues. (Rochelle you are too good)

post-940-1122311006.jpg

Edited by Hendie

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Matisse

Excusez-moi, parlez-vous francais monsieur? ;)

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shaun

No I can't. (parlez-vous francais)

Looks to me like you going to have an answer to this one in your next post!! ;)

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Larry

Shaun, what if I said somewhere in the PEI area.

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Merv

Houses of Parliament, Ottawa? or Chateau Laurier next door?

Edited by Merv

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Kolla

The Fairmont Chateau Frontenac Hotel in Quebec City.

We stayed there one night back in the summer of 2002. It was then rated as 1 of the 500 most idyllic hotels in the world. Personally I was a bit disappointed with the interior, it was oldish and perhaps in need of some upgrades having just previously stayed in the Fairmont Elizabeth in Montreal, also an older hotel, but very stylishly renovated inside.

Still it was a fantastic experience and privilege to be guests. I don't think its worth the money to stay there, we (die gepeupel) stayed for free on Fairmont points, but personally I would not fork out what they charge per night. Walking though, like we all do in the old landmark hotels of Canada, like the Fairmont Banff Springs and Fairmont Chateu Lake Louise and also the one in Victoria and sort of going on a self guided tour, is a good option, then at least you can say you were there and it didnt cost you a sent.

Old Quebec city was very interesting and I would return any day. Not that I have any love affair with Quebec province, in general, it does not feel like Canada to me.

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shaun

Yep Kolla you got it!!!

And I have to agree with all you said about Quebec, it really just doesn't feel like Canada too me either.

The old Quebec City is very beautiful though I must admit.

We stayed in Levis for one night and caught the ferry across to the old city. Very beautiful, but also very commercial in a way.

The Old City is definitly a place for lovers, with plenty of little taverns and pubs all over the place, not to mention the shopping (thank heavens we were only there for one night $$$$$!!).

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shaun

RAAI-RAAI 139

Once again no clues. This one is really easy.

Where is this building.

What is the history (what happened here). ( I mean real Canadian history)

What is it used for today.

Ok one clue.......Anne of Green Gables was not born here...........but there was a birth.

post-940-1123687725.jpg

Edited by Hendie

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shaun

No takers.......

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BevBrad

The birth of the Dominion of Canada ?

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Harry

The Confederation Building in Charlottetown, PEI...the Provincial Government Assembly Building, in actual effect.

See HERE in my Journal of September last year.....

Sorry, man, Shaun. :blink:

Ironically, PEI did not join at the time!...Weird, eh!

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shaun

Dankie tog vir Harry!

Yes the building is in Charlottetown, P.E.I..

It is/was the 'birth' place of confederation. ('real' [a la Harry] Canadian history).

Correct, P.E.I. did not join at the time. Another interesting fact is at the time of the big get together no documents were drawn up or signed, it only happened later. The original meeting was more like a week long tea party. Because of the size of the crowd that attended there was no accomodation anywhere in Charlottetown, the guys from out west (not BC) had to go back to their ship every night and sleep there.

And it is still used today by the Provincial Government.

P.S. Harry, I thought of your journal when I posted this one. I did a search, but couldn't find it. Thanks.

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Harry

RAAI-RAAI 140

Yes, that is THE Leo Tolstoy!

Where in BC (outside which town) was this photo taken?

Who are "the people"I am referring to below?

What was their rather novel form of protest?

Where did they come from originally?

5-08-13tolstoy.jpg

CLUES:

1. He was patron for a group of people who came from a European country

2. They were pacifists

3. More than 7400 of them sailed for Canada in 1898-9 and settled in Saskatchewan

4. Their leader then moved with a lot of them to the area of this town in BC in 1908

5. The leader's first name was Peter..just like a Great leader of their erstwhile country.

6. He was killed in a very mysterious train explosion

7. In 1931 these people were barred from voting in a federal election!!

Those are a LOT of clues....but it is an interesting episode in Canadian history

Edited by Hendie

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Cathy K

Harry

1. Across from the airport in Castlegar, BC, behind the Doukhobor Village Museum overlooking the Columbia River.

2. The Doukhobors.

3. An absolute rejection of the use of violence in human affairs, simple living.

4. Russia

Pierre K.

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Harry

Nice going , Pierre!

That would be

5. Russia

4. Nude protest.

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Hendie

RAAI-RAAI 141

Ek is mossie baie goed met kloes gee nie, maar laat ek probeer:

1. Dié ou se vroutjie is vannie plaaslike mensies

2. Hy het blykbaar omtrent die Rockies uitgemeet.

3. Klaarblyklik is dié dorpie nie die engiste wat hom vereer nie.

post-2-1132034028.jpg

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Kolla

Statue near Lake Windermere of David Thompson and Charlotte Small, his native wife.

More monuments at Bonner’s Ferry, Idaho and at Lac La Biche, Alberta.

Ek het baie respek vir David Thompson. As mens sy lewensverhaal lees, ontvou n ongelooflike verhaal van ontbering en ontdekking. Aangrypend van die ou dae was dat so baie wit manne hier aangekom het om werk te doen vir die Hudsons Bay Company en die verwante 'fur trade" en dan deurmekaar gedraai het met van die 1 st nations girls en dan kinders met hulle gehad het, wat ons vandag ken as die Metis. En dan as hulle kontrak klaar was, die arme vrou en kinders net so hier in die wildernis agtergelaat het. David Thompson het sy vrou en kinders saam met hom geneem.

"He has been called the world’s greatest land geographer. Certainly no man of his time saw the rivers, islands and peoples of the western reaches of our continent with a vision so clear. His precision maps remained the official maps of western Canada for a hundred years and his perceptive writings have enabled us to see the aboriginal peoples of the early fur trade."

From : http://www.laclabicheregion.ab.ca/david_thompson.htm

"In the course of his lifetime Thompson surveyed the prodigious extent of 80,000 miles of wilderness, mapping the trade routes of the North West Company and fixing the positions of their fur trade posts with a precision unrivalled even one hundred years later. "

From : http://www.laclabicheregion.ab.ca/david_thompson.htm

"David Thompson got on well with the Native Americans, among whom he was known as Koo-Koo-Sint ('you who look at the stars') because he constantly used his sextant in map-making. Indeed, his wife, Charlotte Small, was of part Native origin, and while it was all too common for such Native wives to find themselves abandoned, David Thompson was, by all accounts, a devoted husband and father. He also took a firm stand against the highly profitable use of alcohol as a trading commodity, having witnessed the disastrous effects it had on the Native communities.

Sadly, like all the best heroes, David Thompson died in obscurity and poverty, his maps published without him being credited, and his request for a modest pension rejected by the British government."

From : http://homepage.ntlworld.com/david507/01.html

"At Ile-a-la-Crosse (Saskatchewan) he married Charlotte Small, a 14-year-old Cree-Scots mixed blood girl who bore him 13 children (five in the wilderness) and remained his closest companion throughout his life."

From : http://www.laclabicheregion.ab.ca/david_thompson.htm

Read more on the life of David Thompson here : http://www.northwestjournal.ca/V1.htm

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ROOIBOK

RAAI-RAAI 142

I've visited this area recently, any idea where this is?

[i moved your post here with the others of the series, Rooibok...hope that's OK...Harry]

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BevBrad

Montreal

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Harry

Rooibok!

See Raai-Raai 105 :cry:

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