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Hendie

220V AC Appliances In Canada

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corwes

CallieMarie I have been running some of my workshop equipment from SA on 60 hz and have not had any problems . The motor will spin a bit faster and so will the cooling fan. The motor will also be a bit more powerful , that is a trick that is used in industry to get more power out of a small frame motor is to use an inverter  and up the speed and then use a different   gear ratio. The difference between 50 and 60Hz only affect induction motors , if the motor has brushes it will have no effect on speed.

But do not worry about your equipment from back home , you can get used items for dirt cheap. With all the garage sales people have here there is nothing you cannot get. I paid $2 for an orbital sander , $5 for a Dewalt quarter sheet sander . I also got a small table saw for $10 , it came without a blade and I to pay $25 at Home Depot for a new blade , I was outraged , 2,5 times the price of the saw.  In no time you will have a much bigger collection of tools  than what you had back home.

You also get small appliances at garage sales, Kettles and irons $5 , coffee maker $10 , pod coffee maker $20 , microwaves $30. Often new items that was an unwanted gift. Lots of toys and kids bikes. Crockery and cutlery etc. 

The garage sales are usually at the beginning of summer. People do not hold garage sales to recover their money but to make space. Hoping that they might be able to park the car in the garage again.

 

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Nettie

We brought a serious transformer with us and that worked fine. We did not bring our washer/dryer/dishwasher with us. It was more for a few tools and other things that we didn't want to get rid of.

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Hennie vdB

Possibly mentioned already, but transformers can be bought here on amazon. From big heavy duty guys down to cute little ones which drive the fan on my "Biltong King" from Game. Fan speed at 110V just did not do the trick.

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corwes

In Ontario you may do the wiring and modifications in your own home yourself. It must just be inspected by the Electrical Safety Authority (ESA). There is a fee for that and depending on the magnitude of the project the cost varies.  You do not have to be a licensed electrician. We did all the wiring of the house we built ourselves. For new construction they have to inspect all the wiring before the drywall goes up and a final inspection once the panel  is wired. I ran 240v lines to the garage and workshop as well as 20 amp breakers for the 120 volt lines (using yellow wire) so you can run more tools on a line without anything tripping.  . 

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CarelG

Thanks for you input Hennie, Merida, Corwes and Nettie!!

1 hour ago, corwes said:

In Ontario you may do the wiring and modifications in your own home yourself. 

This I like especially :) 

 

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CarelG

Would this influence you electricity bill (x2 as you use would use e.g. 1kw from each live in order to hive you 220v)? 

If you use an inverter, how noisy is it? Any specific regulations on running a electric lead? Length? Fastened? In conduit etc?

(Sorry....the burden of being a compulsive planner :) ... not even there yet!)

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corwes

No it wont affect your electricity bill. The meters register Kilowatt hours, so if you draw 10 Amp at 110V or 5 Amp at 220V it is the same. You will have to get a transformer when you get here because you will probably be renting at first and cannot (may not ) change the house wiring.

 

New transformer are virtually silent , a 2kw one might hum under load.

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CarelG

Thank you @corwes 

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CarelG

Did you ever try welding with a 200A Inverter welder (220v) through a transformer....or am I now pushing it??

 

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corwes

Over here I have seen larger robotic welders from Japan being run through transformers so it is possible. However you will need a big transformer , for your welder at least 3,5 kW. If you ran the welder at 220v and 15 amp at home you will now need 30 amp at 110v . There is just no way around it. You can however make a long thick extension cord to run from the dryer outlet to the garage. Not ideal but if temporary it will do. 

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Merida
17 hours ago, CallieMarie said:

Any specific regulations on running a electric lead? Length? Fastened? In conduit etc?

I really recommend that you have a professional do the electrical work.  DIY can be huge risk unless you are 100% sure of what you are doing. http://www.finehomebuilding.com/membership/pdf/20751/021190076.pdf

 

10 hours ago, corwes said:

There is just no way around it. You can however make a long thick extension cord to run from the dryer outlet to the garage. Not ideal but if temporary it will do. 

It is very likely that the manufacturer's manual does not recommend an extension cord/cable.

 

DIY might seem to save you a few dollars, however the risk could be great.  There might not be a second chance if you make a mistake.  

For example, standing in your pyjamas in the freezing snow as fire fighters try to pull your loved ones from a house fire: http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/home/renovation/advice/a25977/house-fire-speed/

As a sparky said: "Safe wiring is not something to be learned after the fire trucks have left."

 

Here a few links to related discussions by experts etc.:

http://forums.mikeholt.com/showthread.php?t=157058

http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/european-220v-tools-use-us-220v-outlet-9605/

 

Edited by Merida

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sueannejoe

Please advise if i may bring the following items with me to Canada:

20170916_071223-567x1008.jpg

20170916_071248-567x1008.jpg

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M-N
16 minutes ago, sueannejoe said:

Please advise if i may bring the following items with me to Canada:

20170916_071223-567x1008.jpg

20170916_071248-567x1008.jpg

It's not worth it.  You'll need something that can convert down to 110v or you'll need a converter and they're not cheap here.   

Honestly, you can get a coffee grinder for pretty cheap here not sure what the other thing is but likely if it's an appliance you can get it for a decent price.   

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sueannejoe

Thank you @M-N Sorry I forgot to mention the other thing is my electric toothbrush charger so I guess I'll just buy a new one in Canada.

 

I suppose the same goes for my hair straightener?

20170916_071334-340x604.jpg

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M-N
51 minutes ago, sueannejoe said:

Thank you @M-N Sorry I forgot to mention the other thing is my electric toothbrush charger so I guess I'll just buy a new one in Canada.

 

I suppose the same goes for my hair straightener?

20170916_071334-340x604.jpg

I'd get a new straightener too. Same with hairdryers.  I brought my ghd straightner  with but the ghd is 110v -220V so it was a problem.  

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QueenOfHeartsZA
11 hours ago, M-N said:

I brought my ghd straightner  with but the ghd is 110v -220V so it was a problem.  

Wouldn't that mean it would work there? 

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M-N
2 hours ago, QueenOfHeartsZA said:

Wouldn't that mean it would work there? 

Ha yes.  Meant to say it wasn't a problem. :blink: oops.  

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Cathy K

It's simply not worth the trouble. Electrical appliances are not that expensive in Canada.

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Jules

If you happen to have a small item that is 110 - 220v A.C. then you are ok. All you will need is a $2 plug adapter so your SA style plug can fit into a Canadian wall outlet. 

But if your item is only 220 to 240v then you will need a step up transformer because Canada runs on 110v. The transformers are expensive, bulky and don't always work well with some appliances with high speed motors like power tools. (I'm not an electrician so I can't give technical reasons lol)

Best option is not to bring electrical stuff unless it's the travel friendly variable current items like chargers and electric tooth brushes. Lots of those items are listed as 110 - 220v A.C.

 

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Hennie vdB

I got one of the bulky transformers to run a fridge, but you do get nice little cheap and small ones for low current use - I purchased one for about $25 to run my Biltong King's fan. Plugs into the wall and works well.

https://www.amazon.ca/BQLZR-Adapter-Converter-Transformer-Standard/dp/B015R4LE0I/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1505824419&sr=8-4&keywords=110v+220v+transformer

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sueannejoe

Thank you so much @M-N @Cathy K @Jules and @Hennie Calgary for the very helpful advice :)

Edited by sueannejoe
Forgot to thank someone
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FaithFUL

Someone told us that one can take bedside and floor lamps along & simply change the globe fittings and the plugs. Any truth in this?

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M-N
3 hours ago, FaithFUL said:

Someone told us that one can take bedside and floor lamps along & simply change the globe fittings and the plugs. Any truth in this?

If you're bedside tables has 100~200V then yes otherwise nope which is more likely. 

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shaun

Yes they will work if you put a 110v bulb in them and change the plug to flat two pin.

Remember though we don't have bayonet lamps here in Canada. It will only work if you have ES (Edison Screw) lamp holders.......otherwise you will have to change them too.

Seems like a k@khuis vol werk for a bed side lamp......just buy a new one here rather.

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Hennie vdB

I agree with Shaun. I did the same with a few lamps we brought over. Not sure about other places, but here in Calgary it is not easy to find a replacement plug, and the ones I could find were big and bulky. Easiest solution was to buy a 2m extension cord, and connect the cords, instead of replacing the plug.

Appears that changing plugs is not a common thing in these parts - when my son was changing one on a fridge, his Canadian girlfriend was extremely concerned that he is attempting such a dangerous task without being an electrician.

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