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Hendie

220V AC Appliances In Canada

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Harry

Larry,

my record player is a Pioneer deck that I bought in 1980. It is fully switchable to 120V, but I lost the bush for the capstan to adapt from 50Hz to 60Hz. I guess I could forgive myself for losing it in 20 years! So I ground the 50Hz capstan down.

I realised I had to do somethng when the rdramatic "Overture to Tommy" by The Who sounded like Boeremusiek.

Edited by Harry

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shaun

Sean

I spoke to a couple of guys here at work, and it seems like it could be a problem with the frequency and the TV. The inside of you screen is coated with a chemical that reacts, by lighting up, to the exposure of cathode rays. Namely the cathode ray tube TV as apposed to the plasma TV. With the increase in frequency (50hz -60hz) the chemical is being exposed for a shorter (although more frequently) period of time per second causing it to not light up as bright as it should. The reason why you are getting patches of discolouration is because of the variance of thickness of the actual coating.

This is all way out of my league, so I will not accept resposiblity for the above info, but mearly am passing it on.

Shaun

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CliveLeonard

Does anyone have experience in using converters/transformers with particular appliances such as a microwave, bread machine, vacuum cleaner and a tumble drier?

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Harry

I'd be very careful trying to run a heavy power consuming thing like a drier via any form of voltage up-conversion arrangement. These things need serious power and that is why most homes have 220V laid on specifically for the heavier power consuming equipment like electric stoves, washing machines and driers.

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Gautenger

Hi Clive, I echo Harry's caution about high amperage equipment, but it can be done - always make sure that your converting equipment's AMP rating is higher than that of the equipment you are running off it.

This is where the danger lies - an appliance that requires say 15 amps to operate will basically 'take' 15 amps from the source regardless of whether the source can supply 15 amps or not. If the source cannot supply the required amps it will overheat. If your are lucky the source equipment will short out & trip the mains, but if you're not it can cause fires & even an explosion.

Try to never run equipment over 66,7% of the source amp rating and you will be safe from overload.

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shaun

Drier and stove circuits are 220v in Canada. Some of the older houses don't have 220v stove circuits, but rather a gas line, while some driers have a 110v circuit for the motor and a gas line for the heater. All "modern" homes have a 220v circuit somewhere.

If you are adamant that you want to bring your appliances with you, 220v can be hooked up in your house, but there are a lot of other factors to take into account.

*when you first land, you will more than likely be renting a house or staying in an appartment. 80% of these facilities already have appliances, or a laundry/laundomat down stairs.

*If you are renting, how happy is your landlord going to be with you installing 220v outlets all over the place (assuming there are none).

*What is the cost of bringing all the stuff with you (containers/insurance) compaired to replacing it over here.

*When it eventually packs up who will repair it. North America is a very disposable society (gooi weg en koop n ander een).

*How long can you live with out your old appliances, while waiting for your container to arrive. And what are you going to use in the mean time.

* There are an array of other factor with regards to the electricity supply, and compatability of your appliance to the North American system.(discussed at length elsewhere by myself and others on this site)

*If there was ever a problem (heaven forbid) with the appliance causing damage (fire/flood) to the dewelling, would you be covered by the insurance co's here in Canada having used or having been cause by an "out of town" appliance that doesn't bear the Candian equivilent to the SABS markings.

These are just a few factors that have to be carefully considered before making the final decision.

If you really really have to bring the stuff with you, then use transformers/converters on the stationary appliances. Things like vacuum clearers and the more "portable" stuff will become a bain having to cart the transformer/converter around with you through out the house.

Look at immigration as dying and going to heaven (I'm not trying to upset any of the religious folk here).

Its all only just stuff, and you can't take any of it with you. Besides in heaven they have their own stuff for you to use!

As you can see from my above posting I am one of the folk that don't support the idea of bringing appliances with you. Maybe someone can set up a poll with the regards to the bringing or leaving of appliances.

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CliveLeonard

Shaun, Gautenger, Harry ... thanks for the replies and advice, will do another 'scan' through our 'stuff' and see what we should bring and more importantly, what we should leave behind!

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Ann

I found the following link that describes the electrical differences around the world:

Domestic AC power plugs & sockets

150px-B_plug.jpg

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shaun

Excellent site.... good find Ann.

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Larry

Shaun,

Maybe you want to elaborate on the amount of split phasing available in homes and also if the dual socket with multi phasing is common?

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renierL

Hi everyone. I see there are different opinions on this issue. Our immigration officer also has different views on this matter. I understand that basic stuff like kettles, microwaves, washing machines etc. will have to be sold here and re-bought there.

I do have one or two fancy things though, that I was wondering about. I have a fairly new plasma screen tv, and a very nice home theatre system that by itself costed about R25 000. If I sell these things here, I will not even get half back of what I payed for it. Also considering that they are 240v. So do I take them along, or do I sell them ?

Your thoughts will be highly appreciated.

Thanks

REDANT

Edited by redant

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Pierre

Redant, the topic is discussed elsewhere to a large extent. Just do a search on Sacanada.

Shortly though: All houses have washing machines, tumble dryiers and microwaves. There are 5 or 6 appliances which come with a house as a rule. Includes fridge, dishwasher, stove.

They all have built in heating systems in areas where house heating is required.

There are a few options for adapting to the 110V 60hz system in the houses.

1. The washer , dryer and stoves are wired up for 220V. They have different plugs so they cannot be confused with the 110V supply. The power to houses are 220V at the distribution box which is tapped down to 110V for distribution in the house. One can extend the 220V to other appliances which you bring along from SA. I did this recently on a 220V biltong slicer which came from SA. The difference in speed due to 60 hz vs 50hz is not very large although it is noticeable.

2. You can bring a transformer along from SA to take the 110V up to 220V to operate things that can only run on 220V. This would include a monitor, elec lawn trimmer, printer, sewing machine etc. Up to a max of 1000W. The amps have to be below 15A. The transformers are sold in SA and has north american plug outlets.

Some small appliances like a kettle, elec heater, iron, are not worthwhile bringing since they are very cheap here and usually more modern, is not worth it.

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dieulefit

Nope Pierre, houses in Ontario are a little different! If your appliances are build-in, then they stay - if not, you can stipulate in your contract that you are taking them with! I would advice folks not to bring appliances as they will not be able to have them serviced here even though you can get for eg Bosch, Miele etc - they are mostly different models. Having said this, I do have a friend who brought her washer and dryer (AEG) and are using them here with a transformer. So, it is the chance you take and it is valuable space in your container where you could have rather filled it with a precious piece of furniture!

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tigs

Redant

If your TV and home theatre are LG and bought in SA then they may well be dual voltage and will work here on 110v, however remember the differing TV format here in North America - PAL vs NTSC, your system will probably just be good for watching your DVD,s if your DVD player is globally enabled. We discovered by chance and were amazed (read the specs) that the LG TV,s, DVD players and VHS players, as was our Kenwood CD player, that we had in SA all worked on dual voltage so we brought them over to play the kids tapes and DVD,s.

Tigs

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Ann

Maybe contact the customer service department of the manufacturer/s of your 'fancy appliances" and ask them about dual voltage on the appliances. It might be even better to speak to their technical department.

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Harry

Redant ( and Tigs)

I bought a nice new TV in SA a few months before leaving. It has multi-system, being capable of both types of North American NTSC, PAL and SECAM. I screwed up on one count. It was only 240V.

I has lived in my lounge as the main TV of my house in BC since September 2000....no transformers...no hassles...just 240V. It still has the best quality picture of all 6 TVs in the house.

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tigs

Harry

That confirms a suspicion I have had for a while. Most modern TV's dont have to decode the TV signal, it is already decoded by the satellite/cable box and then fed to the TV as a straight digital feed, the TV acts actually just like a computer monitor. My current LG plasma tv accepts my computer without trouble - great for playing Doom or Quake. I thought about connecting my SA tv up to the cable box to see what happens, but the task of lugging the tv up from the basement to the family room to connect it up is something to be left for the boredom only brought on by the depths of a Quebec winter. I may be wrong though - anybody tried it?

Tigs

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Harry

Tigs,

I think I understand what you're saying, however, our TV works on the direct RF feed directly off the cable without he benefit of Shaw's digital or decoder service. Only one TV in our house has a Shaw digital decoder, and it is NOT the ex-SA Samsung that I shipped here. The decoder is required only for digital channels.

So that SA TV is real NTSC and real PAL and real SECAM.

Of course, if you merely want to use your TV as a display system ( that is, you ignore its tuner), you can just put that signal into the digital "LINE" inputs, if your TV has those and if the signals are compatible...then your comment would hold, I believe.

I must say that I have always been under the impression that that PAL/ NTSC/SECAM are picture/scan standards....that is...if you feed an NTSC LINE signal into a TV's LINE inputs, and that TV is PAL, you'll get garbage...... Hence the trouble with videotapes.

However, there are greater experts here on this stuff than myself. I'll defer to them. Just put "NTSC" into our search engine and you'll find heaps of discussions on the subject.

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Buzz Lightyear
While we were still fairly new here (before all the stuff we brought with like coffeemakers and things wore out) I rigged up a very simple 220 volt power supply. Don't try this at home, but I tapped 2 live circuits from a wall plug into one plug and instant 220 volts! Worked like a charm

Hi Merve,

Can you tell me more about this method you used? Just took two plug outlets and placed them in serie?

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Harry

Buzz,

look HERE.

This is seriously dangerous and against code and could void your home insurance and you REALLY should not do it. Technically, however, it is 100% true. You can also read the earlier posts on that thread.

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happystones

I put a couple of these plugs in my house. Very easy to tap off 230 V from the panel, ( a new breaker, the correct legal and safe way with the correct Yellow wire).

These are 230V 15 outlets. So these are the same as SA spec, sold at many regular hardware stores, Rona, Home Depot etc.

I have some in the Garage too for my tools.

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CarelG
On 2/20/2008 at 4:10 AM, happystones said:

I put a couple of these plugs in my house. Very easy to tap off 230 V from the panel, ( a new breaker, the correct legal and safe way with the correct Yellow wire).

These are 230V 15 outlets. So these are the same as SA spec, sold at many regular hardware stores, Rona, Home Depot etc.

I have some in the Garage too for my tools.

Almost 10 years on.....what is the verdict, specifically regards to the last (quoted) post? If you install new/extra 230v breakers, tapped from the dryer/stove wires, is it legal, safe and advisable to wire up some plugs?

(We are coffee lovers with a R30k machine and some high end woodworking tools I want to take with)

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Merida

No, he is not meaning a new breaker tapped from dryer/stove wires, but an entirely new breaker.

When you have a look at your electrical panel you will typically see that it states the total of number of amps available, e.g. 100 Amps for a flat/apartment.  Probably more for a house.

Of course, a tenant is not allowed to make any changes at all to the electrical wiring.  Highly unlikely that a landlord would allow any electrical changes.

This is an example of an electrical panel showing the breakers.  You can tell which ones are 220/230V as they are bonded together, e.g. on the left hand side the 30amp & 60amp breakers:

58f66b8c1a8ed_electricalpanel.jpg.0801def99820d94f333ce3980be39a87.jpg

Once you know the total number of amps available on your electrical panel then you subtract those that are already used.  There might be some amps left over for a new double breaker for 220/230 volt appliances.  Of course, this must be done by an electrician.

Have you looked at the wattage that is required for the coffee machine and power tools?

It might be simpler to use a transformer if the wattage required is not high: 

 

Edited by Merida
Only electrician to add new breakers
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CarelG

Thanks @Merida

I was wondering if anybody got any damage on high wattage tools etc from the cycle difference (50/60Hz)after about 10 yrs.

It seemed like he didn't "jump" two breakers to create a "new" 220v output, but rather piggybacked of the existing 220/230v connection already installed on the DB, keeping in mind the amps available/left on that circuit. I presumed the existing 220/230v would be sufficiently earthed, whereas the new one wouldn't (my understanding from threads). 

Alas....does it work, or do I leave it here (this would be a loss)? If it will work well for a reasonable lifespan, it will go with. 

We plan to buy a house, so no landlord worries. 

 

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Merida

   Based on what he said, it seems that it was definitely a brand new breaker (circuit), i.e. not piggybacking on an existing circuit:

On February 19, 2008 at 6:10 PM, happystones said:

I put a couple of these plugs in my house. Very easy to tap off 230 V from the panel, ( a new breaker, the correct legal and safe way with the correct Yellow wire).

An example I know of, of the possibility of using an existing breaker, is a town home that had the electric baseboard heater removed, as under floor heating using only 110/120V was going to be installed.  Baseboard heaters use 220V (and electrical geysers which are called hot water heaters here), as well as stoves and tumble dryers.  However, it is not common to have electric baseboard heaters in a house, usually only when there is no gas connected to the home.  Here houses are typically heated using a furnace ; apartments typically heated using boiler(s), i.e. hot water heating system.

Typically here the 220V circuits are dedicated circuits, i.e. stove has it's own breaker; dryers has it's own breaker etc.  Not multiple outlets like regular 110/120V circuits.

Happpystones was last on this forum in 2013, therefore unlikely to respond.  However, this might help answer your questions: 

It seems electrical appliances/tools that have motors are affected by the hertz difference.  

@CallieMarie, you mention that your power tools are high end.  Are they made in Europe or China or? 

Edited by Merida
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