Perry

Well, here we go (landing 16/04/2019)

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Perry

Morning all

Tickets booked for our two-week trip to activate PR and as an LSD.  
Arriving in Toronto on the 16th, renting a car and driving down to Sarnia to stay with friends of my wife's family for a few days.  Then road-tripping Ottawa-Quebec-Montreal and back to Toronto before flying back.
Madly trying to pull the goods lists together, battling a bit because half my stuff is in a storage unit in Durban. Going to have to go down at least one weekend and catalogue it between now and then.

Best

Perry

 

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Jules

Good luck. Your first Canadian lesson in terms of subtle differences is the date you listed in your subject title. A Canadian would write it as 4/16/2019

They use a MM DD YYYY format. There another 1000 things they do and say different here   

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GrantM
5 hours ago, Jules said:

Good luck. Your first Canadian lesson in terms of subtle differences is the date you listed in your subject title. A Canadian would write it as 4/16/2019

They use a MM DD YYYY format. There another 1000 things they do and say different here   

This kills me, I honestly have tried to change (almost 4 years now) but I just can't get it right. My boss knows mine is always DD/MM/YYYY so he is ok with that. The only time that it feels natural to me is when writing the date out like April 4th, 2019.

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logan

I tend to stick with the ISO standard YYYY-MM-DD (from biggest to smallest...). But that's the great thing about standards -- everyone can have their own...

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MaryJane

16/Apr/2019 .... then it avoids confusion I suppose. 😉

Have a safe trip!

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Nettie
On 3/26/2019 at 7:04 AM, Jules said:

Good luck. Your first Canadian lesson in terms of subtle differences is the date you listed in your subject title. A Canadian would write it as 4/16/2019........

Really? I didn't know it's the same as the US? 

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Nelline
22 minutes ago, Nettie said:

Really? I didn't know it's the same as the US? 

It is at my place of work. We have to use MM/DD/YY

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LidiaS77

As far as I can tell different date formats are used in Canada, sometimes certain ones are used in certain contexts. I've seen them use MM/DD/YYYY and DD/MM/YYYY and YYYY/MM/DD etc. From Wikipedia: "Date and time notation in Canada combines conventions from the United Kingdom, the United States, and France, often creating confusion. The Government of Canada specifies the ISO 8601 format for all-numeric dates (YYYY-MM-DD; for example, 2019-03-27)". In the same way they also mix the metric and imperial system using pounds, cm, inches, kg, feet etc. for random things. I've never heard anyone use Fahrenheit though, temperature is usually Celsius as far as I can tell.

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GrantM
1 hour ago, LidiaS77 said:

I've never heard anyone use Fahrenheit though, temperature is usually Celsius as far as I can tell.

Except when cooking...

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LidiaS77
Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, GrantM said:

Except when cooking...

Oh yes of course, the oven is in Fahrenheit! And I just heard someone referring to a fever of “over a 100”. Please disregard...😄 

Edited by LidiaS77

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Jules
5 hours ago, Nettie said:

Really? I didn't know it's the same as the US? 

The banks use the US system. If you write a cheque the SA way you are likely to have an issue. There are some companies who use day/month/year but they are in the minority. 

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logan
On 3/26/2019 at 11:04 PM, logan said:

I tend to stick with the ISO standard YYYY-MM-DD (from biggest to smallest...). But that's the great thing about standards -- everyone can have their own...

 

16 hours ago, LidiaS77 said:

The Government of Canada specifies the ISO 8601 format for all-numeric dates (YYYY-MM-DD; for example, 2019-03-27)".

Woohooo! At least as far as dates are concerned, I might fit in!

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GrantM
14 hours ago, Jules said:

The banks use the US system. If you write a cheque the SA way you are likely to have an issue. There are some companies who use day/month/year but they are in the minority. 

I'm still blown away how popular cheques are here still.

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Jules
3 hours ago, GrantM said:

I'm still blown away how popular cheques are here still.

True. I haven’t figured out why - because there’s so many mobile banking options these days. Old habits die hard. 

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OutOfSa
On 3/28/2019 at 6:47 PM, GrantM said:

Except when cooking...

EVERYONE ! I know, work with or have contact with uses Fahrenheit especially in pool heating and house heating.  All nuts, bolts and spanners (what's a spanner?) wrenches are imperial.  All wire is AWG (American wire gauge.)  Wood is inches, nails, tools, wire is a mix of feet and meters.  

$1000000 is not $ 1 000 000, it's 1,000,000.

It's a complete hoge-poge of mixed systems

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Nettie

 

On 3/28/2019 at 8:33 PM, LidiaS77 said:

Oh yes of course, the oven is in Fahrenheit! And I just heard someone referring to a fever of “over a 100”. Please disregard...😄 

For some reason parents still give the weight as lbs for their kids and yes, the fever of over a 100 (F). I trust dr. Google to give me the right conversions to Celsius and kilograms.

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Jules
On 3/30/2019 at 3:27 PM, OutOfSa said:

EVERYONE ! I know, work with or have contact with uses Fahrenheit especially in pool heating and house heating.  All nuts, bolts and spanners (what's a spanner?) wrenches are imperial.  All wire is AWG (American wire gauge.)  Wood is inches, nails, tools, wire is a mix of feet and meters.  

$1000000 is not $ 1 000 000, it's 1,000,000.

It's a complete hoge-poge of mixed systems

Going to Home Depot to buy tools or building supplies is a challenge considering the mix of metric and imperial. 

Canada really is caught in the gap between two systems and cannot fully commit. We say Canada uses metric but imperial is alive and well in many categories. 

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M-N
On 4/6/2019 at 7:10 AM, Jules said:

Going to Home Depot to buy tools or building supplies is a challenge considering the mix of metric and imperial. 

Canada really is caught in the gap between two systems and cannot fully commit. We say Canada uses metric but imperial is alive and well in many categories. 

This.  I constantly fund myself using both. Temperature is celsius, road is km, weight is pounds if I can remember the conversion. Dates, ugh, all over the place.  I confuse myself sometimes.  

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Jules
On 4/7/2019 at 10:00 PM, M-N said:

This.  I constantly fund myself using both. Temperature is celsius, road is km, weight is pounds if I can remember the conversion. Dates, ugh, all over the place.  I confuse myself sometimes.  

These days I know my weight and height in pounds and feet. House size in square feet. Road rules all in metric including purchase of gasoline. Temps are metric. 

Grocery store is an ungodly mix when buying products. 

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Cathy K

So Tuesday is the big day. Enjoy the trip en visit with friends.  I hope Toronto's weather is going to be kind to you.

Hectic times ahead.

(I see your post has been hijacked a bit. 😉 Not to worry, you will soon get the hang of all of it. Metric, Imperial, date, etc)

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