Sign in to follow this  
Guest Joshua

Why Canada?

Recommended Posts

Harry

...and they would change the definition of "marriage" to include relationships with giraffes, who do not quite reach 30 foot but get close, in the desperate hope that the vote of giraffes would keep them in power despite their once per quarter revelations of graft and kick-back contracts.

Yeah! You have a point there Dougie.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
patche

Relationships with giraffes....Harry, you are sooo Gross!! :unsure::P (But it's an accurate description of the Liberal modus operandi! :D )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry

Just earning my new name....Dufus Pottymouth, or whatever! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cathy K

Why Canada?

Well......

Even the coldest parts of the country feel warmer in winter than the Highveld. That's because winter clothes are warm, homes, malls and heck! all the other buildings, are heated. If you trek to Calgary you'll find that they have toasty glass-domed walkways over the roads in the centre of town. This keeps you dry and warm when you move between buildings.

You can swim everyday in winter, because most towns have indoor public swimming pools.

Your children can have their own private ice rink in the backyard in winter and you can drive onto the lakes in you fourwheel-drive SUV to do some winter fishing.

I understand the hunters have a field day over here, but personally I don't approve - being a vegetarian.

:D

Then I haven't even touched on all the other winter activities like skiing, skating, etc.etc. For some or other reason South Africans take to the snow like a fish to water. They even end up liking ice hockey!

And then there's the summer. You think the Bosveld is warm; just be in Toronto next year in June! :P

Canada is the second largest country in the world and one of the most scenic. Add to that the fact that it is largely uninhabited (one source says 85% of the country) and you have a lot of wilderness to explore. An almost three month long summer school holiday gives ample time to pack that camping gear and head for the mountains/lakes/forests/beaches. Remember to pack the bear spray!

No politician makes dreary political speeches on our national holidays. Instead they all club together for some pancake flipping or hamburger barbecuing. National holidays consist of colourful parades, outdoor concerts and ample family time and entertainment.

Thanksgiving is a family feast when the whole family congregates at one relative's home. The poor turkeys have nowhere to hide, but one comedian commented: "Did we have a turkey for dinner? Of course! He sat right next to me!"

Remembrance Day commemorates the fallen of all the armed conflicts in which Canadians participated. I don't quite know what's the connection, but on this day you'll hear a lot of Scottish bagpipe music. Coming to think of it...the Canadians sure love their bagpipes.

Christmas is a magical time when each and every city lights up and become an enchanted fairyland. Everyone must experience a Canadian Christmas at least once in his life.

A few other reasons to choose Canada: the United States is just over the border, Hawaii holidays aren't just pipe dreams anymore and for the kids - there's a Disneyland visit to look forward to. :unsure:

Please note that I didn't repeat that personal safety is a given, or the lack of burglar bars, or said anything about the late night strolls that you can take without any dire consequences. ;)

Cathy K.

Edited by Die Kotzé's

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hendrikvw

Hi There All,

I've read the post in this forum with interest. I've made the comment before elsewhere here that I think this generation of Afrikaner (South Africaner) will somehow continue to be on the move. Our children will be the Canucks, Kiwis and Ozzies - the ones that settles.

Ourselves: We have been in New Zealand now for a little over three years, after trying twice to make the move. It is a great country with its own interesting phenomena, and we are very happy here. Our citizen applications are going in this month, and we have assets and interests here more than what we had in South Africa. Not only are we here, but most of our immediate family has also joined us. We decided that we will always have roots in New Zealand, and therefore we are applying to be citizens.

Once the initial shock and disappointment in the South Africa situation, and the adjustment of settling into a new country settled, we realised that we wanted to see more of the world. Therefore, we are now also applying for Canadian Residency.

Our children, and us are eager to explore more cultures, other sports, new destinations, etc.

We consider ourselves now as "Global Citizens"! We have been "Globalized"!

To some extend I don't think we are much different from a group of people you find in each country / culture that appears to be moving around the world: Here in New Zealand we encounter English, German, Croatian, Russian, Indian and many more groups who appears to be migrating around every 4 to 5 years...

I guess the only difference between them and us is that they have a place they call "home", which is England, Germany, Mother Rushia, etc.. We are a little stuck in that regard - we don't have a place we call home anymore. What we had in South Africa we don't have anymore. Africa don't want Europeans.

The Afrikaner identity - as far as the immigrant generation is concerned - is up in the air at the moment. And it remains to be seen if it will survive the next 3 to 4 generations both here (in the rest of the world) and back in South Africa.

So, we have to call some place home. My family and I decided: Earth is home. New Zealand is second home, and if we like Canada more, then who knows... maybe we will end up on an Island in the caribean after next...:-)

Windgat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry

More than two years ago I posted some stuff here that I still believe to be true. However, it was posted partly in Afrikaans and in different posts on this very thread. Since I recently had to summarise it for someone on a thread that may not remain alive, I thought I'd list it here so it stays pinned. I've now had to search for it one too many times, so I'd like it kept by our software. No reactions are hereby solicited.

A. Why Canada?

  • Canada has relatively easy immigration requirements compared with the USA and Oz..even if it does not always feel like it.
  • At government level the country has a positive urge to get immigrants ...even if it does not always look like that.
  • After three years you can apply to become a citizen of Canada....that's quick, even if it feels long.
  • It is less expensive to get going here than in the UK...Sterling is expensive and life there is expensive.
  • A strong social safety net to catch you when you fall.....just read around here.
  • A relatively good national health system despite the valid criticism.( Compare the UK)
  • Pretty good government schools ( compared with USA and SA)
  • A Growing Western Economy with low inflation and low interst rate. Capital is cheap ( compare SA)
  • Next door to the USA with all its business and economic advantages (Compare rest of world)
  • Easy access to the USA if you become Canadian citizen.(Compare rest of world)
  • Your kids are safe at school and going to and from there.( compared with USA and SA respectively)
  • Unbelievably low crime rates..you can sleep with your doors open (See USA & SA)
  • "Frontiers"-spirit outside the cities that SA folks can understand (compare with the UK)
  • Big on outdoor life, just as in SA.( compare the UK)
  • A collossal country to explore and be a human in, after the mindless stresses of SA*
  • South Africans feel welcome here (cf Oz) and are appreciated, despite some pains.
  • The Canadians are decent people with compassion and and respect for their fellow man.(I better shuddup)
  • Status!? Canadians do not understand questions on that subject ( Compare SA and UK)
  • A near-infinite choice of things to do for entertainment/fun/relaxation ( Compare Pretoria!)
  • It is the place to be if you want a good balance between the Free Market System and Healthy social values( cf USA & SA)

*: The typical SA white male is stressed out of his soul and does not realise it til he has been here 3 years. Life was never supposed to be the mindless hellhole of stress it is in SA...at least not the SA I left behind in 2000. This was a point made to me by Another ex-Pretorianer here....he was right.

B. The price you pay for all this is:

  • Many rules...these folks have forms for everything..and a person that speaks French to file it.
  • Political correctness....a huge problem for SAs who believe that honesty = directness
  • Soul deadening diplomacy..but one learns to read between the lines eventually.
  • Unions that bedevil one...but they do not kill people like in SA

...This generally feels like a good deal to me!?.

C. Adaptation

My take on the adaptation thing is something as follows, after being here about 70 months:

1. SA folks are Jacks of all Trades..folks here work in narrowly defined jobs, often with unions and licenses

2. In SA, losing a job is like death in the family....over here you take a holiday and decide what to do next

3. SA folks are big on huisvriende....to folks here this is almost a no-no..very tight private space per person

4. SA folks have a cynical sense of humour.....the folks here laugh at totally different stuff..sometimes sarcastic

5. In SA you save for retirement....here apparently no-one saves at all and the future has to look after itself

6. In SA do-gooders are distrusted...folks here have doing social good as part of their national self image.

7. SA folks are aggressive in many domains.....the folks here are pacifist to a point of making it a religion.

8. SA folks see virtue in talking straight...the folks here are the most diplomatic nation on the planet.

9. SA folks lean on average toward conservative...the local folks lean on average toward liberal

10. SA folks are used to taking risks...here nothing happens until the insurance is sorted out.

Finally, I believe they even group stuff differently in supermarkets here than in SA.....it is never where I expect it to be, but that might just be me. ;)

I think points 1, 3 and 8 are the ones that really catch the SA folks that come here....at least, we have found these things challenging as a family. :(

D. Finances

Last year in October, placed a post that tries to address the matter of how people handle their family finances here in Canada. Unless things have changed very drastically in SA ( and the may have), the differences are rather profound. I suggest you read it HERE.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cathy K

I just read an article written by Barbara Kay in the National Post, in which she describes something totally alien to South Africa. She attended a luncheon hosted by the Montreal Board of Trade at which Stephen Harper was a guest. She explains at length how suspicious looking she must have appeared to most security minded government officials: toting a sports bag and wearing a fairly hefty leather backpack-style purse.

When she entered the Palais de Congres where the luncheon was held, she noticed that none of its many entrances were guarded.

At the check-in desk they were quite happy to accept her statement that she was covering the luncheon on behalf of the National Post, and issued her press card without asking for identification. She proceeded past the escalator ushers, past the door usher, without anyone asking to look into, or enquiring what was in her sports bag. By then she had passed what should have been four security checkpoints in the interest of the PM's safety at a long scheduled and well-publicized event.

At the table where she was seated, were numerous cameramen riffling through heavy black bags full of equipment, big enough to conceal any manner of weaponry. She could only assume that their credentials were as readily accepted as hers. There were likely some bodyguards or plainclothes RCMP, but she saw none. When Stephen Harper entered, he got a standing ovation and walked past many guests who were within touching distance of him.

Now this is the kind of country I like to live in. Compare Stephen Harper's entry into that crowded room with the arrival of say mr MBeki - or even George Bush - at any function they attend. One always reads about the racing cavalcade of a dozen or so black limousines accompaning even minor celebrities and government officials in South Africa. :D

Cathy K.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BevBrad

WRT the topics question, after reading this newspaper extract, whats left to discuss?

Link to article Ft McMurray

.........

The scale is what you don’t understand until you come here.

Alberta’s oilsands cover an area three times the size of Nova Scotia. There are an estimated 1.7 to 2.5 trillion barrels of oil in the sand here, seven to 10 times more oil than is in Saudi Arabia’s proven reserves.

That’s about 400 trillion litres, 400 cubic kilometres — enough oil to fill the Bay of Fundy four times over. Enough to supply the entire world’s oil consumption for almost 100 years. Enough oil to make a lot of people rich.

Oil sells now for $73 US a barrel. So the oil in the oilsands is theoretically worth $200 trillion Cdn, a mind-boggling number. Our country’s whole economy is only $1 trillion a year.

But only about a third of the oil is accessible with current technologies, and it’s not a matter of pumping it out of the ground, as they do in Saudi Arabia or Texas. It must be mined and separated from the sand, or extracted by pumping steam into the ground and pumping the oil out. It must then be refined to make it light and sweet enough for the market.

"It’s the single largest hydrocarbon deposit on the Earth, and it’s next door to the biggest market for oil products, the United States," Neil Camarta, a former Shell oilsands executive, told an American paper.

"What’s wrong with it? It’s crap oil. . . . You’ve got to use a lot of energy and a lot of pots and pans to extract it from the sand, and you have low-quality oil. It’s a high-cost business and a lot of capital and a lot of operating costs."

..................

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bluebonnet
Greefs, I don't know how long you have been here, but I think you should give Canada a chance.

To think that Canada is just like the US is a mistake. It is a distinctly different country, and thank goodness for that!

I think that Canada is gentler, more sophisticated country in many respects. The dollar is not our god and there is a good mix of North American culture and European influence to be found. People are civil, pretty decent and not as loud mouthed and plastic as in some parts of the US. Plus, immigrants are more readily accepted and allowed to keep their own cultures and value systems. The US is a giant melting pot.

After living here for a decade and always thinking that the US was better, I have changed my mind completely. Canada is the place to be and if you put your mind to it and allow yourself time to settle in, you will not regret coming here. The country has a lot to offer those who let it. Sure, it's not perfect, but neither is the US, Australia or any place for that matter. Life is what you make of it, wherever you are. Be grateful to be here - there are places far worse, that I can tell you, and the grass is not always greener elsewhere.

Although I have never lived in Canada, only in the USA, I must say I know of many people that will agree with you 100%. I love the part "Canada is gentler, more sophisticated" and "immigrants are more readily accepted and allowed to keep their own cultures and value systems"

All of us that left SA are immigrants, no matter where we go. Even if we become a citizen of our "new" country, we will always be immigrants.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Karin Nell

I only read through a couple of pages - trying to work in between reading. LOL

I spent just over 2 years doing research on Canada, USA, Australia and New Zealand. Any country where we couldn't speak one of the official languages were immediately scratched off our list (we spent 3 months in Prague, and it is HARD if you don't understand the people and they don't understand you) and we didn't like the UK as an option. After finally finishing all our research we scratched Australia and New Zealand of our list as well. And the US is so difficult to get into, that it is temporarily of our list (although not completely). So, we are going to Canada... :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
boeg

In hindsight, I would say that if you don't have a rare skill that will get you over on a work permit or PNP, don't bother.

At the present rate, Skilled Federal PR takes four years to acquire. If I knew three years ago what I know now, I would be well settled in New Zealand by now. We have delayed starting a family so that our kids can be born Canadian, but at this rate I will probably hit menopause before we get there :cry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Blesbuck
'boeg' date='Jan 2 2008, 09:08 AM' post='80411']

In hindsight, I would say that if you don't have a rare skill that will get you over on a work permit or PNP, don't bother.

If you're not a doctor or an engineer or artisan with a contact in Fort McMurray, you can forget a work permit

At the present rate, Skilled Federal PR takes four years to acquire.

When we started in 2005 the average wait was about 26 months, in 2006 in became 32 months and the last guys in 2007 waited 43 months

So you can add about 6 months for every year you wait

It went along nicely at 32 months for a while until Monte Solberg changed it from 300 000 to 250 000 emigrants per year and everything came to a standstill

If I knew three years ago what I know now, I would be well settled in New Zealand by now. We have delayed starting a family so that our kids can be born Canadian, but at this rate I will probably hit menopause before we get there

Same here, a friend of ours in the Coffe Club, Pippa decided against the long wait and they've been living in Australia for nearly a year

If you were to hand in your application in 2008, you are going to wait five to six years to get to Canada

You'll only be going in 2012, that's four years of Zuma and Cosatu

And five more years of crime

And to put your life on hold for five years, even three feels like forever ?

And what is the Rand going to buy when you eventually get there ?

Edited by Blesbuck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dedré

The best is then to apply for a Student (Study) Visa. The spouse may work and the children may come along.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cathy K

I agree the situation is desperate. We waited a mere four months for our application to be approved in 2001. I have already written a letter to our local MP, highlighting the plight of would-be immigrants from South Africa. Perhaps more of us should do this.

I don't think the Canadian government truly realises the plight of South Africans, literally dying to get to Canada. We in Canada might just be able to make a difference. The situation and waiting times can change if more MP's are better informed.

Let's get involved! PM me if you need to see a copy of my letter, I'll gladly pass it along.

Caty K.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
natalieh

It's not only South Africans waiting so long. Remember Pretoria processes applications for the whole of Africa. I know people who are applying from England and are also waiting for 4 years.

PNP applications and people with arranged employment are being fast tracked at the moment and a new class called CANADIAN EXPERIENCE is coming into effect in 2008, thereby lessening the amount of Federal skilled worker visa's.

Canada's immigration programme is now largely Employment based. And no, you don't have to be a doctor, engineer or artisan to get a work permit. What I suggest is to do like Karin Nell is doing and plan a visit to Canada and setup some interviews with the view to getting a job here. A lot of Brits are doing that and are successful.

I took a huge risk and came over, made contacts and have a work permit as a Retail Salesperson. (My husband was given an open work permit). Not the field in which I am trained for, but it's a start. I am here and making an application for PNP. I will also wait to see what the Canadian Experience class is about and maybe go that route.

So, I know it's hard and costs a bit, but if you can get here and meet with employers you can jump the line up.

Edited by natalieh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
boeg
It went along nicely at 32 months for a while until Monte Solberg changed it from 300 000 to 250 000 emigrants per year and everything came to a standstill

I was about to curse Monte Solberg until I stumbled upon THIS IMMIGRATION OVERVIEW put out by mama Canada herself. The amount of applications accepted does not, in fact, appear to have decreased between 1996 and 2006, but I have to stare in disbelief at the claim that there are no backlogs. Things have perceptibly slowed. My only thought is that the stream-lined applications have caused a log-jam effect. When applicants had to gather all their documents before submitting,do a lot of thinking and research, and cough up the various sundries, there was a steady trickle. Now people can submit their applications with little preparation, cost and, sometimes, little foresight, resulting in a flood of paperwork. In some instances its a case of submit today and think about it in three years.

Cathy, your efforts are really appreciated. I, and I am sure many others, cannot thank you enough.

I would implore other South Africans who have 'made it' not to forget those who still wait in anguish. We can't afford to rock the boat, but you can speak for us. Please, please help us. In the meantime, I sincerely hope that there aren't people applying just sommer to see what happens. It would be interesting to see what happens when CHC asks for documents on the streamlined process. I would be prepared to bet that half those applicants will be living elsewhere by that time, or will not be interested anymore. Not that CHC would ever reveal their internal goings-on, so it will forever be speculation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Paisley

boeg - I considered moving to Canada and did the whole prelimanary test in 1990. Was very keen, but had to postpone due to being stupid and being sidetracked. Than I did everything again in 1996, again same story. Now I actually lodged the application in September 2007. I am in Ireland since 2001. Irish baurocrats are slower and less knowledgeable than in South Africa. I took a bet that I will be in Canada long before Ireland grant me citizenship or permanent residence.

I only have muself to blame for being so stupid and listening to people. I know you may end up much quicker in Oz or NZ as I have family in Oz. I think I will take my chances with CIC. Maybe a whole plane load of South Africans should arrive in Canada and apply for political asylum. If it work for Nigerians and fellow black South Africans, I am sure it will for the "whities" :cry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Karin Nell
When applicants had to gather all their documents before submitting,do a lot of thinking and research, and cough up the various sundries, there was a steady trickle. Now people can submit their applications with little preparation, cost and, sometimes, little foresight, resulting in a flood of paperwork. In some instances its a case of submit today and think about it in three years.

Funny enough - had thoughts along similar lines a couple of days ago. I posted a list of helpful websites on another forum that I chat, and someone added the "notcanada" site to the list. I had a look at it a bit earlier and this was my thoughts:

It is why you have to do proper research... There are a oversupply of graduates in certain fields, and people immigrating that is qualified in those fields, will have to do work outside of their field, and because most of those are highly specialised, have to resort to "hard labour". One can't just apply for PR without doing a LOT of research and making 100% sure that you know what you are getting yourself into... I am willing to bet you that the people that complain most, are the ones that just blindly made their decision, believing that are going to the land of milk and honey and not willing to make it work...

I've spent more than two years just on research (about everything from weather, crime, salaries, housing, insurance, you name it) before we made a choice. After we made our decision, I started getting every application form for every little thing that we might or might not need and completed them (thus, two weeks ago I already had tourist visa, work permit and permanent residency application forms completed, as well as application forms for every thing that we need to get in SA). That done, I started applying for jobs and sending resumes to every company I could get hold of, and I'm still doing that for at least an hour to two every day. I would rather we go there and have a job already, than taking the chance of not having one. I hope that it will happen soon, but I'm not holding my breath - we are well aware that this could drag out for a couple of years. But I'm not going to sit on my butt and wait for PR before I start doing something... I've already made valuable contacts, should we get PR in 4 years time and then need a job.

Wanted to add: I am amazed to see how many people (that is just people I hear about) decides one day that they want to emigrate, pick a country and appoint a lawyer - it is actually scary. If you ask them anything about the country itself, they more often than not can't really tell you anything than it is a good place to go to.

Edited by Karin Nell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
natalieh
But I'm not going to sit on my butt and wait for PR before I start doing something... I've already made valuable contacts, should we get PR in 4 years time and then need a job.

Well said girl, this is the attitude that will get you to Canada faster than you know and you will make a success of it too.

Wanted to add: I am amazed to see how many people (that is just people I hear about) decides one day that they want to emigrate, pick a country and appoint a lawyer - it is actually scary. If you ask them anything about the country itself, they more often than not can't really tell you anything than it is a good place to go to.

Yes, and then they complain when they get here that they hate Canada

Edited by natalieh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Paisley

Karin I have to agree with you. It also depends on the person self. I have been living in Europe since 1996 and three countries later I still find it exicting to move to a new country after a few years. I am not one of the very clever, highly educated, with six phd's etc. I have have a few skills and find that I am always able to find a job in what I am qualified for. The problem with South Africans are that they have this attitude about job reservation and attitude that the employer will make huge mistake if they do not employ them. "Almal wil baas posisie he". They are the ones that suffer. I have a few companies in mind and will contact them as soon as I have the green light from CIC. In the meantime a take my time. My grand mother always told us not to make decisions when we desparate or when we feel down. They will most of the time end up in disasters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cathy K

A letter by our Canadian friend and valued member, Bob Fitzsimmons, to the Prime Minister:

"Everybody knows, with the exception of the government, that Canada is short

of qualified people in many areas.

There are many, many of those type in South Africa, and Europe, who wish to

come here but can not because of quota restrictions imposed by the

government. In effect the government is sending those people to Australia, United

States, New Zealand, by denying them access to Canada.

Why is the Government doing such a STUPID thing when we need those people

here in Canada? Why is there a quota system that hurts our country and our economy? Why is

the government deliberately ignoring this huge problem, which is easy to

fix?

There are more than 250,000 uneducated illegal immigrants in Canada that the

Government supports with Millions of Dollars in welfare, but qualified, well

educated people, can NOT get in to work and help Canada grow because of

poorly conceived quota restrictions.

What kind of a Leader causes harm to the country he is supposed to be

leading to a better future?

What kind of a Leader allows Illegal Immigrants to remain here for 3 or 4

years at Government expense which costs Millions of Dollars of tax payer

money?

What kind of Leader causes harm to the economy by denying Qualified

Immigrants to come here to work and support the country?

Is it not time the Government recognised this HUGE problem and fixed it?"

Thank you Bob!

Cathy K.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Karen

I have heard - and I stand to be corrected here - that Canada has some arrangement with SA to only take in X amount of immigrants a year. Something about not taking all the skilled folk away, but how dumb is that. All those folk will simply get themselves to Australia or NZ etc.

To be honest, if you cannot get out of SA in the time span you want ( before you hit menopause!), do consider Australia. It's a beautiful country with great opportunites and the weather is easier to adapt to. As for waiting for your kids to be born here, I see no point in that. Your kid will become a Canadian citizen within three or so years of being here and be part of the majority who just happened to be born elsewhere in the world.

My advice to all who are waiting and waiting - look at ALL your opportunities, do your homework really well and above all, carry on with your lives to the best of your ability where you currently are now. Things always seem to have a way of working out for the best, whatever.

I will be in Jhb from Feb 14- March 5, so if anyone is interested in chatting about Toronto/Canada whilst I am there, please PM here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
boeg
I have heard - and I stand to be corrected here - that Canada has some arrangement with SA to only take in X amount of immigrants a year. Something about not taking all the skilled folk away, but how dumb is that. All those folk will simply get themselves to Australia or NZ etc.

I have suspected as much for some time. There is no way of getting any South African politician or bureaucrat to confirm or deny such an allegation. Do you think their Canadian counterparts would be more responsive, and if so, can one of the kind canadian resident's dig up some information on this rumour? Please?

If it is true, then it lends credence to my theory that those applying on a "whim" (so much easier to do when you're on the stream-lined application) are really buggering it up for the rest of us. The next time some successful PR applicant gives up on Canada after three months, I am going to vloek them blind! ;) Think of all the resources and manpower wasted on a clump of dithering fainthearts that could have been spent on a serious application. Like mine.

Karen, I am closer to getting Canadian PR then if I were to start all over somewhere else, but I agree that prospective emigrants should seriously consider Australia first. In hindsight, New Zealand would have been a lot faster, so if I could teleport back three years, I may have gone that route.

As far as waiting to have children in Canada is concerned, I am less worried about citizenship, and more worried about the risks attendant on being pregnant, giving birth, and having a tot in pre-apocalyptic SA, which risks run the gamut from the medical to the social. I somehow doubt that the average Canadian looks at a pregnant woman and thinks "easy prey", or looks at a baby and thinks "aids cure/muti". I also know of too many cases of bad births mismanaged by doctors, and of HIV infected blood transfusions.

But back on topic, perhaps the best thing to do is to invite the powers-that-be to join this forum, so that they can taste and touch our heart-ache, our despair, our fear, and maybe, just maybe, we can give them pause to reconsider any pernicious quota pact with the devil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hennie_dup
If it is true, then it lends credence to my theory that those applying on a "whim" (so much easier to do when you're on the stream-lined application) are really buggering it up for the rest of us. The next time some successful PR applicant gives up on Canada after three months, I am going to vloek them blind! ;) Think of all the resources and manpower wasted on a clump of dithering fainthearts that could have been spent on a serious application. Like mine.

Karen, I am closer to getting Canadian PR then if I were to start all over somewhere else, but I agree that prospective emigrants should seriously consider Australia first. In hindsight, New Zealand would have been a lot faster, so if I could teleport back three years, I may have gone that route.

As far as waiting to have children in Canada is concerned, I am less worried about citizenship, and more worried about the risks attendant on being pregnant, giving birth, and having a tot in pre-apocalyptic SA, which risks run the gamut from the medical to the social. I somehow doubt that the average Canadian looks at a pregnant woman and thinks "easy prey", or looks at a baby and thinks "aids cure/muti". I also know of too many cases of bad births mismanaged by doctors, and of HIV infected blood transfusions.

But back on topic, perhaps the best thing to do is to invite the powers-that-be to join this forum, so that they can taste and touch our heart-ache, our despair, our fear, and maybe, just maybe, we can give them pause to reconsider any pernicious quota pact with the devil.

Well said Boeg, I can't agree with you more. Every person coming back makes me think "if not for them I might have been there already..."

On having babies in SA, I think one has to be crazy to now consider having babies while here. As a matter of fact, I think any civilised person with children who chooses to remain here, should have their heads examined, or else the care very little for their children, to condemn them to a non-existing future...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cathy K

We're getting momentum here. Bob Fitzsimmons sent his letter to 30 MP's from all the political parties and The National Post published a letter from me in today's paper.

I have explained South Africans' dilemma in a private letter to their Letters Editor. Previous communications with him resulted in some interesting editorial comments and articles about South Africa.

Hang in there! Anyone else helping yet?

Cathy K.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this