4DEE

Province choice for Engineers

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4DEE

Hello all .I'm new to the forum.

I am a professionally technologist and I am considering choosing Alberta as my province of immigration.What do other immigrant engineers think of Albeta? Idealy,I prefer EPCM firms that do industrial projetcs like water ,petrochemical ,mineral processing ,energy (as long its not building services).  

Anyone else here who went to Alberta or considering Albeta as province?

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Andrew and Tash

Hi 4DEE

I'm a mechanical engineer, and received PNP from Ontario. My understanding of Alberta is that it's very much based on oil and gas, and that there had been a downturn in activity the last few years. From what I've researched thus far it looks as though Ontario has a lot of opportunities in all of the sectors you mentioned, except perhaps petrochemical. I'm from the EPCM environment myself and it looks like all the major companies are represented in all provinces, but with most offices in Ontario.

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4DEE

Thank you very much Andrew and Tash for giving me valuable insight.I will need to do some extensive research there.To boost my EE points ,I will have to secure a job offer since provincial nomination requires you to be already in Canada (work permit or perm residence : I speak under correction here )?

Will explore Ontario.Congrats on your Ontario PNP. Its encouraging to hear such news.

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MaryJane
30 minutes ago, 4DEE said:

To boost my EE points ,I will have to secure a job offer since provincial nomination requires you to be already in Canada (work permit or perm residence : I speak under correction here )?

Not necessarily.

Some PNPs do not require a job offer. These are quite popular streams though and tend to fill up quickly.

You may want to explore some of these streams if you feel you require a boost in your EE score.

Good luck!

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TJG

I recently read an article on the upturn of the Alberta oil and gas sector, so I would not rule it out as a viable option. Also give thought to your professional registration. APEGA (Alberta) and PEO (Ontario) differ slightly in their requirements for registration of internationally educated and experienced engineers. Professional registration is very important for the marketability of Engineers here in Canada.

I am a Structural Engineer in the Oil and Gas Industry in Ontario.   

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4DEE

Thank you all for your advice.I just read more about APEGA. You must be a Canadian Citizen or Permanent resident to apply for P.Eng license.If you reside outside Canada ,you can apply as a 'Licensee' ,which has the same weight as P.Eng.48 months of engineering experience is required but what confuses me is that they require 1 year of Canadian work experience (which I don't have).

Someone told me to apply for IET then get the P.Eng once arrived in Canada.I am still waiting for response from Professional Engineers of Ontario (PEO) ,as I want to note the different board requirements as mentioned above by TJG.

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TJG

If you're applying to the PEO, you will have to apply for the EIT designation first, and go through the entire process of registration to become a P.Eng.

http://www.peo.on.ca/index.php/ci_id/22546/la_id/1.htm

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4DEE

Noted ,with thanks @TJG

Lemme start gathering all the info and documentation.

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Lizelle

If you need a job offer to move to Canada, it can be a seriously hard slog (read, almost impossible.  Some people have done it, just like some people have won the lottery).

Oil prices are up, but the discount that Canadian oil gets paid is still very big (around $30, last time I checked), and Alberta oil investment is seriously down. Plus, all that downsizing left a lot of engineers looking for work.  I would be very surprised if there is enough of a shortage to convince a company to look outside of the country for an employee.

Have you looked at NZ?  They might not have that much oil, but they do a lot of geothermal things.  Plus, moving there is a heck of a lot easier than Canada if you don't have enough EE points.  

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4DEE

@Lizelle

Thanks a lot for giving me insight.A lot of people have told me about the downturn of the oil industry in the Alberta province and this is quite a scary thought.I haven't checked NZ yet.I was still gathering as much info as I can before I pull the trigger.Besides being tough to secure a job offer ,how does Alberta compare to other provinces like Ontario,British Columbia as far as the engineering field is concerned? 

On 8/21/2018 at 3:08 PM, TJG said:

I recently read an article on the upturn of the Alberta oil and gas sector, so I would not rule it out as a viable option. Also give thought to your professional registration. APEGA (Alberta) and PEO (Ontario) differ slightly in their requirements for registration of internationally educated and experienced engineers. Professional registration is very important for the marketability of Engineers here in Canada.

I am a Structural Engineer in the Oil and Gas Industry in Ontario.   

 

On 8/21/2018 at 3:08 PM, TJG said:

I recently read an article on the upturn of the Alberta oil and gas sector, so I would not rule it out as a viable option. Also give thought to your professional registration. APEGA (Alberta) and PEO (Ontario) differ slightly in their requirements for registration of internationally educated and experienced engineers. Professional registration is very important for the marketability of Engineers here in Canada.

I am a Structural Engineer in the Oil and Gas Industry in Ontario.   

 

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4DEE
Posted (edited)

@Lizelle Just to add on ,I am not entirely inclined only to oil and gas industry ,I am also involved in large wastewater treatment plants as well as mineral processing projects.In short,I wrk for an EPCM /Consulting doing all those.So from what I researched and heard from the forum members here,seems like Alberta is heavily dependant on the oil and gas industry.But its good to know 

Edited by 4DEE

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4DEE

I will decide and think about it,although someone here did mention that Ontario seems to have better opportunities than AB.

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Lizelle

Hmm.  I am not familiar with EPCM companies.  I am, however, very familiar with Fort McMurray (oil situation), and waste water construction (husband is doing a good chunk of the $1 billion Calgary waste water upgrade currently going on - https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/city-bonnybrook-billion-megaproject-1.4747130).

Canada has a massive waste water problem.  A crap ton (pun intended) of raw sewage is going into fresh water (https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2018/08/13/one-trillion-litres-of-sewage-leaked-into-canadian-lakes-and-rivers-over-last-five-years.html).  The company my husband works for is also doing waste water treatment upgrades in Vancouver and Vancouver Island.  There is big money in it at the moment.  But that is the construction side.  I am not sure how EPCM would feature into that. 

As for the oil and gas industry.  Remember that a lot of people from all over the country moved to Alberta for work.  When the work ended, they went back to their provinces.  The oil sector in Alberta is seriously depressed.  They have started to do some drilling close to Calgary, but that does not seem to translate into more work for people.

I am not sure how all that translates to you.  Canadians believe that no-one could possibly know what they are talking about unless they got their experience in Canada.  Which makes it really hard to get a job offer from SA unless you have some really extraordinary skills that they need.  

I think the best way to test the water is to simply apply for work.  Look on the job sites and see how much work there is available for you.  That would tell  you which province is better.  

Also look on the NZ jobsite (https://www.seek.co.nz/ is good) and see what you can find there.  Apply for work.  Although, be warned, work visas take all of 5 days to process in New Zealand (unlike Canada, they assume that you know what you are doing, even if you did not work in New Zealand yet)(look up your occupation on this list - http://skillshortages.immigration.govt.nz/ - if you are on the critical skill short list, companies don't have to prove that they could find no local to do the work.  But even if you are not on that list, it still takes 5 days to process).  So, don't apply for work unless you are willing to move in the next month or so if you find something.  

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Lizelle

I asked my husband, and he's never heard of EPCM.  It is not something that is used in the construction industry here.

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4DEE

@Lizelle Thank you for your info. EPCM are in general ,consulting /design engineering companies.They work with contractors/construction firms although you can find some who do both. Companies like Worley Parsons, Jacobs, Hatch,Vista Projects are examples of Engineering ,Procurement and Construction Management (EPCM) companies.I think its just a different terminology.

I  haven/t checked New Zealand (although it could be an option)yet but I am hoping to have immigrated out of South Africa by end of end year if all goes well.

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Lizelle
Posted (edited)

They have worked with Jacobs, and maybe Worley Parsons. I did look up what it stands for, and told him, but it did not ring a bell. If I search for EPCM companies in Canada, most seems to be oil and gas. It may be something to consider as you write up your resume. Look up the jobs you want, and then frame it in the terms they show it there.

Did you mean end of next year? If you meant end of this year, then your choice is pretty much NZ. 

( :) I also realized this morning that waste water can also mean industrial waste. We have just been using the term to mean people waste so long that it stuck in my mind like that)

 

Edited by Lizelle
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TJG

I have observed something here in the Canadian engineering fields which tends to differ a bit from S.A. In S.A, engineers tend to be "jacks of all trades" more often than not. We have responsibility splits, across construction management, project management and design. Here in Canada roles seem to be more specialized, i.e: you're either a dedicated project manager or design engineer etc. That said, if your experience and in particular, resume reflect a broader role in engineering and the position you're applying for is more narrowly defined, employers may see you as not being completely suited to it, even though you know you can function well in it. Back in S.A, I worked in a "design office" but served a very broad role in the way I discharged my duties. Here I am a "traditional" design engineer. This is just something new comer engineers have to be cognoscente of. Of course this goes out the window, if the job you apply for, requires you to fill a broader role. 

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4DEE

@TJG. I have heard someone say that as well.You are right ,a design engineer here will do the design ,project management ,site construction management etc.In some countries ,design engineers are separate from site engineers.

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4DEE

Good day people.Besides being already tricky in securing work contract while outside Canada,isn't it a bit difficult as well to apply for work without Canadian licensure? I had a quick browse on some job boards and its seems for most of these jobs,P.Eng/P.L status is a big plus (similar to here in SA where having a Pr.Eng/Pr.Tech/Pr.Techni Eng is also an asset).Also came across a few jobs that mention EIT requirement on the Canadian job boards.

How did you folks navigate that? You first secured work contracts then worked towards your P.Eng licenses while you were already in Canada? You can get P.Eng while outside Canada but is there any one of you who followed that route (althogh a tricky route ).Just trying to get some understanding.

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TJG

As an internationally educated and experience engineer, you will have to meet all the requirements for your PEng license, most, if not all, of which are only achievable while here in Canada. Requirements include but are not limited to, education review, ethics & legislation board exam, experience review and referee questionnaires. The provisional license designation was developed by the PEO, to assist with the marketability of landed engineers. 

My advice would be to, register as an EIT + immigrate, work for a Canadian engineering company and then pursue your PEng license. Trying to do this process in reverse is unfortunately impossible, in my opinion. 

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4DEE

Many thanks @TJG

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