HopefullySoon

Settlement funds and visa options

Recommended Posts

HopefullySoon

My husband and I want to immigrate to Canada, and I will be the main applicant.

I am a secondary school teacher by qualification, but a primary school teacher by job description and experience. My husband is a construction project manager. 

We are well aware that securing a job before we depart is slim to none, but suppose we are able to (without getting our hopes up), what do we do visa-wise?

We want to ideally get PR through the EE route, but we are also willing to go over on a work permit if this is possible. 

If we go over on a work permit OR if we can secure a job offer to submit along with our EE application, is there still a required settlement amount? (Does a job offer cancel out the need to show a specific amount of money?)

Does securing a provincial nomination speed up the process significantly?

Excuse my many questions, we are still new to the process and don’t know all of the ins and outs yet. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lizelle
Posted (edited)

If you secure a work permit, then the settlement amount is not needed.

However, securing a job as a teacher will be exceedingly difficult, even with full PR and being in Canada.  Those jobs are continuing to get slashed, and budgets have been frozen for some time.  I also believe that a lot of those jobs are unionized.  Your husband will have a better chance securing a job (though I would be very surprised if he will be able to get one from South Africa.  Construction is doing pretty good, but it is not facing severe shortages to such an extent).

If you are able to secure provincial nomination (again, not something that I think has a good chance of happening), then you will be selected earlier in the EE pool (your points will be higher, so you will be selected the next time a selection happens).  Getting the provincial nomination seems to be a long process, though.

If you are not married to the idea of Canada, I would look at NZ if I were you.  The construction industry is booming over there, and Construction Project Manager is on every skill shortage list that you can find  (http://skillshortages.immigration.govt.nz/construction-project-manager/).  That means that the company does not have to prove that they could not find NZ workers to do the job, it is assumed there are no NZ workers to fill that job.  You can get a work permit processed in a week.

There has been articles about the fact that the NZ construction industry if facing a severe worker shortage.  If speed of immigration is a consideration, your husband can be working in NZ next month (if you have all your ducks in a row).  Anyway, something to think about. 

Edited by Lizelle
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HopefullySoon

One issue that we have with immigrating anywhere is that in SA my husband’s work experience still counts for a lot because he knows so many people in the construction industry, but in other countries they need you to have a qualification, which my husband doesn’t have. He is in the process of getting a certificate, but it won’t be complete for another couple of months. So basically we we are not sure if even NZ with its shortages will accept us. 

I have made peace with the fact that I won’t easily (or at all) get a job in education, as I have heard from many sources that it is next to impossible. We still need my degree, experience and Ielts score as main applicant to get the visa though. If securing a visa is the last thing I get to do with my degree then so be it. 

You say if we secure a work permit then the settlement funds are not needed. Is that still true if we can submit a job offer together with our EE visa application? We’d like to have PR right off the bat. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lizelle

If you have a job offer for Canada,  then you have to get a LMIA (Labor Market Analysis thing).  When you go into the EE pool, your job offer gives you more points.  So, you get a job offer, then the LMIA, that then gives you a Work Permit.  You can then move to Canada and start working.  Somewhere in this process, you enter the EE pool, and get your PR (you can do the Work Permit and PR at the same time).  Again, I have to stress that you may need to cross this route completely off your thinking.  The chances of you getting a job offer from SA is so small as to be non-existent.  (I could sugar coat this point for you a little if you like, but that does not change this fact, and your mental resources may be better spent elsewhere).

I would seriously look at NZ if I were you (my husband worked as a PM in NZ, so this is something that I have good knowledge of :) ).  Their system works completely different than Canada.  Even if you are not on a shortage list somewhere, for a company to give you a job offer is exceedingly easy if there are job shortages.  Not having paperwork behind the experience will be a lot less of an issue in NZ than in Canada.  Employers in NZ tend to think that your experience in SA counts for the same as experience in NZ (so, 5 years experience is sort of accepted as 5 years experience).  In Canada, experience outside of Canada counts for very little.  In construction (both in Canada and NZ), the bigger question is the money amount of the projects he worked on.  

Personally, I would look on a NZ job seeker site (https://www.seek.co.nz/) and see how many jobs your husband qualifies for and/or wants.  The construction terminology is pretty much the same in NZ as in South Africa.  Apply for a few jobs, and see what response you get back.  That will be your biggest indicator of your chances there.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lizelle

On the NZ immigration website they say the following: 

"ANZSCO Skill Level 1, 2 or 3

you have a relevant recognised qualification at or above the level described in the ANZSCO, or
you have the relevant work experience that ANZSCO states will substitute for a formal qualification (for any skill level 1 occupation you can substitute the qualification specified by the ANZSCO with 5 years of work experience, even if the ANZSCO does not state this), or"

ANZSCO Skill Level 4 or 5, or not in ANZSCO

you have a relevant recognised qualification at or above level 4 on the New Zealand Qualifications Framework, or a level 3 qualification included in the List of Qualifications Exempt from Assessment, or
you have at least three years of relevant work experience, or"

https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/tools-and-information/work-and-employment/skilled-employment

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HopefullySoon

You have definitely given us food for thought, we will consider this and see where we can get a foot in the door. We considered Australia for a time but that proved to be near impossible, we actually thought NZ would be more of the same so didn’t really look into it. We’re quite keen on relocating to Canada though, but I know that securing a job beforehand is extremely unlikely. I appreciate your input since you have so much knowledge on this matter - definitely something to think about. Thank you :)

Are you leaving NZ for Canada and why (if I may ask) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lizelle
Posted (edited)

:) yeah, we never did qualify to get into Australia.  We only qualify now that we have NZ citizenship.

We have been in Canada since 2010.  We moved to NZ in 2004.  We have been very sad that we moved out of NZ :)  

When we looked at immigrating we wanted to move to Canada.  However, I was still studying at that time, so we had to get PR and not work permit.  We looked at Canada, but could not see a lot of work at that stage.  My dads' wifes' sister ( :) ) lived in NZ at that time, so he suggested we look there (we had to go find NZ on a map :) ).  Turns out it was seriously easy to immigrate, so we did that.  We lived in Auckland, and did not like it very much.

In 2009 we were living in Vanuatu (small tropical island off NZ), and I happened to see that the Canadian immigration system had changed.  We were feeling hot, and thought something colder would be better (pfft, turns out that was a completely false argument :) ).  We had time, and were sort of in between places, so we figured, why not?  

We did not so much leave NZ as move towards Canada.  We really liked NZ.  It is much less of a nanny state than Canada.  In NZ, as long as you don't bother your neighbour, you can do pretty much what you like.  In Canada, is someone can think of a rule, you can bet it is in there.  Not that the people in NZ don't follow the rules because there are not many, the police there don't even wear guns :) But all those pretty snow pictures pulled us towards Canada (insert snickering Canadians here).  

Edited by Lizelle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HopefullySoon

We qualify to get into Australia, but there are a heap of hoops to jump through, and to make matters worse, it is so incredibly expensive 😱. Hubby has always wanted to live in Canada, even aplied but didn’t go through with it many years ago before we were even together. I’d like to relocate to a country that actually has neighbours - NZ and Aus are isolated - so I said let’s go for Canada then. But nothing is set in stone yet. We will see what the future holds. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lizelle

Well, good luck with whatever you decide :)  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MJames

Hi there,

Thanks for this great info. OZ seems more difficult to get into than NZ and Canada. 

@LizelleAnd Vanuatu!! that must have been amazing! I might just follow the long way to Canada via NZ first :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HopefullySoon

On one hand, we really want to go to Canada, but securing a job beforehand is highly unlikely. So you’d end up there with your life savings and “hopefully” you find a job before poverty finds you. On the other hand, my husband and I are not so keen on NZ, probably because we’ve never considered it, nor have we done any research, BUT we’d probably easily get jobs before we go. All we do know for absolute sure, is that we don’t want to be in SA anymore. I have family and friends in Aus, so that would have been ideal, but it is almost impossible to get in there - requirement wise as well as financially.

Lizelle’s information and input is indeed very valuable. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lizelle

 

5 hours ago, MJames said:

And Vanuatu!! that must have been amazing! 

It was funny, this was a few years after there was a Survivor Vanuatu.  The locals were all laughing about it, since there is food growing just about every step you take.  They apparently had to clear out a bit, and forbid the contestants from going anywhere else, otherwise food would never become a problem :) .  There are lots of creepy crawlies, though, I would definitely not want to sleep outside on the floor.  

When I look at the cost of coconut water in the shop, I am seriously missing the abundant coconuts that we had on the island :) 

5 hours ago, HopefullySoon said:

 I have family and friends in Aus, so that would have been ideal

The flights between Oz and NZ are pretty cheap.  Also, as soon as you get NZ citizenship, you qualify to work in Oz without any work permit.  You just move.  There is a big row currently between NZ and Oz because NZ citizens don't get all the government perks (you don't qualify for student loans, for example), but from what I can see, for the average person, that really would not make any difference.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MJames

@Lizelle Ha ha ha... Survivor.
With all this moving from one country to the next...You are a seasoned pro. I am sure you can answer some of my questions....

Best relocation company??-> Share a container with someone else or just take the knock for a door to door service? Stuttafords?? 
Investments/Retirement Funds??-> Your advice or companies you used for this? I have been looking at FinGlobal and Expatri8 (Retirement), FNB Global account for normal Cash transfers. Any thoughts?

Thanks

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lizelle

@MJames   - I am generally on the fence about bringing your stuff over.  When we moved to NZ my dad packed our stuff for us a little later.  Just general things, and then we used part of a container.  It took about 3 months to arrive.  It was not very expensive, but I cannot remember at all who we used or how much it cost.  We didn't really have a lot of household stuff at that stage of our lives.  The stuff we got was nice, but we could probably have bought it in NZ for the same price.

When we moved from NZ to Canada we only landed with our suitcases.  We had a 2 year old at that stage, and probably half of our suitcase space was toys and nappies :)  .  We also brought our pots and pan set that we bought in NZ (we are still using it now :) ),  and a few odds and ends like a nice set of glass cups (that we are also still using) that the mother in law bought us in NZ.  

I have never missed anything that we did not bring over from NZ, but we also did not have any really nice stuff that we would have bothered with.  Generally, when you look at the cost of shipping things vs buying new on the other side, you might as well buy.  But that does not include all the random little crap that you can pack into the nooks and crannies of your container.  

We met a family here that has a whole house full of South African stuff and antiques and "kaggel kakkies", as my dad's wife calls it :) .  There is no way they would have been able to buy that stuff here, and all of it is very personal.  Selling it in SA gets you nothing.  So, in general you have to look at the replacement value when you get here.  But, if you have an antique couch or table that you just have to bring, then you might as well pay for part of a container and bring as much as you can (you would not believe the amount of stuff that my dad fit in the drawers of the table that he sent, and all the stuff packed underneath it.

We moved out of SA before we had the need to figure out how to transfer money or investments or retirement funds.  We had shares when we moved from NZ to Canada, but that was easy to just keep it in the account that we had until we decided to sell it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Talent79
On 15/04/2018 at 4:58 PM, HopefullySoon said:

My husband and I want to immigrate to Canada, and I will be the main applicant.

I am a secondary school teacher by qualification, but a primary school teacher by job description and experience. My husband is a construction project manager. 

We are well aware that securing a job before we depart is slim to none, but suppose we are able to (without getting our hopes up), what do we do visa-wise?

We want to ideally get PR through the EE route, but we are also willing to go over on a work permit if this is possible. 

If we go over on a work permit OR if we can secure a job offer to submit along with our EE application, is there still a required settlement amount? (Does a job offer cancel out the need to show a specific amount of money?)

Does securing a provincial nomination speed up the process significantly?

Excuse my many questions, we are still new to the process and don’t know all of the ins and outs yet. 

Good day. I happened to bump into your post and thought i should add my input. Well, i successfully immigrated under the AIPP. I first applied for a work permit and no proof of funds was needed. I also secured a job while I was still in Polokwane,  South Africa. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Talent79

@HopefullySoon, you can give the AIPP a shot, its the cheapest and quickest way i can think of so far of getting to Canada 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HopefullySoon

You actually used to live close to me, the world is actually so small. I now have a million questions for you:

What line of work are you in? That might make a difference.

Also, could you tell me how you went about securing a job? Did you just apply at random companies or did you use a recruiter of some sorts? 

Please explain the process you followed, and what visa you ended up with? (PR or not)

Please excuse my ignorance, I am still very new to this - what is the AIPP? You mentioned cost - please give me more details? 

Sorry for the many questions - I hope you don’t mind. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Talent79
Posted (edited)
On 4/21/2018 at 5:45 PM, HopefullySoon said:

You actually used to live close to me, the world is actually so small. I now have a million questions for you:

What line of work are you in? That might make a difference.

Also, could you tell me how you went about securing a job? Did you just apply at random companies or did you use a recruiter of some sorts? 

Please explain the process you followed, and what visa you ended up with? (PR or not)

Please excuse my ignorance, I am still very new to this - what is the AIPP? You mentioned cost - please give me more details? 

Sorry for the many questions - I hope you don’t mind. 

 

HI HopefullySoon, AIPP is the Atlantic ImmigrationPilot Program, which was opened for the Atlantic provinces. We landed as a family of 5 with me as the main applicant. I am a truck driver, and qualified under Atlantic Intermediate-Skilled Program and we were required to have 6500 CAD as our settlement funds since i had a job offer. The program doesn't use the points system. I started in November 2017, and landed late January 2018 on a work permit. I then submit my PR application and it was approved last week on 17 April 2018. So my family has settled well in Kentville, NS

Edited by Talent79

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HopefullySoon

Where do I begin the process through AIPP? Thanks so much for your input!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Talent79
24 minutes ago, HopefullySoon said:

Where do I begin the process through AIPP? Thanks so much for your input!

The program is employer-driven. So the key thing is to secure a Job Offer in the 4 Atlantic provinces namely Nova Scotia,  New Brunswick,  Newfoundland & Labrador and Prince Edward Island. The moment you secure that job, the employer then is obliged to sponsor the whole process of your immigration. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HopefullySoon

Do you mean IELTS and medicals as well? Or should one be “job ready” by having done IELTS already?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Talent79

Doing IELTS increases your employability,  but its needed at PR stage application. You first go over on a WP. Medicals are needed when you apply for the WP, and I would suggest you do the medical exams upfront after getting an endorsement so that you dont delay your WP process.

So make sure your resume is done in Canadian format, and your cover letter is straight to the point and start sending applications. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HopefullySoon

Thanks so much, you’re incredibly helpful. We’ve booked IELTS now, hopefully that will increase our chances. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now