Julie Brown

Find a school first or find a home first?

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Julie Brown

Hi everyone

So it seems our move might suddenly be only a few months away...eeeek.

I'm wondering what the general consensus is around whether you should find a school first then a home to rent close by? Or a home first then a school close by?

Am I correct in saying your physical address directly impacts the public schools your child can attend?

We have a 4yr old and a 1yr old so will need both Kindergarden and a daycare. Looks like we might arrive around April...do you think a school would take them for the remainder of the school year?

Thanks for the help...it's all a little daunting.

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Sarika

Hi Julie, not speaking from experience, but I would look for an 'area' first i.e. areas that have a school, public transport and shops all close by. All the best :ilikeit:

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Jules

Because of the tight school zone system, you will find that the better the neighbourhood the better the school. So I would concentrate on where you want to live. But overall most public schools are very good. My only suggestion is to avoid areas with a high concentration of immigrants and refugees from non-English speaking countries. There can be some educational challenges when there's a high concentration of kids who don't speak English well. 

Walk the neighbourhood.

 

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MaryJane

I agree with the consensus.

Neighbourhood first then school.

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Julie Brown

Thanks so much everyone. 

Does anyone have any experience or opinions around starting at a school so close to the end of the year?

Do you think we'll run into any problems with finding a school willing to accommodate?

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Tracey22
7 hours ago, Jules said:

Because of the tight school zone system, you will find that the better the neighbourhood the better the school. So I would concentrate on where you want to live. But overall most public schools are very good. My only suggestion is to avoid areas with a high concentration of immigrants and refugees from non-English speaking countries. There can be some educational challenges when there's a high concentration of kids who don't speak English well. 

Walk the neighbourhood.

 

We are experiencing an interesting shift in our neighbourhood.  The area is typically new immigrants, and first generation Canadians.  Housing is predominantly single family homes, with a few rows of townhomes.  York region is building a bus rapid transit in our area, and thus the city is approving a lot of condo developments.  We are seeing that more lower income immigrants are moving in than were there before, and so our area is becoming more non-english speaking.

Also, the high school that my son attends has a programme in place where students from China can attend high school.  This has increased the non-english speaking component of the school.  

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Jules

I actually like the cosmopolitan make up in most schools. Kids get to grow up with other kids from diverse cultures. But it needs to be balanced with a large majority of kids who have English as a first language - and that can include kids born here from immigrant parents from all over the world. 

We live in a sub division neighbourhood that is like the United nations but there's still a healthy balance of kids in classes who are 100% fluent in English (even if they don't come from an English home).

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Tracey22

My son has learned a little bit of Russian and Mandarin as a result of his friends coming from these countries.  The kids are perfectly happy communictaing in mixed languages.

The negative of all of this - the first thing kids teach each other is how to swear - so he can now offend people in English, Afrikaans, Hebrew, Russian, French and Mandarin!

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Lizelle
10 hours ago, Tracey22 said:

The negative of all of this - the first thing kids teach each other is how to swear - so he can now offend people in English, Afrikaans, Hebrew, Russian, French and Mandarin!

:) how is that a negative? That sounds pretty cool.

(there is a fair amount of evidence that swearing is a very good stress reliever, now he can swear in a different language, and not offend the predominantly English people. Think about hearing someone say "sheisse".  Though we all know it means ":censored:" in German, it does not have that same swearword feel - As an explanation to Ann, whom I have confused with my comment :) )

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Qrios1

@Lizelle not so loud, you dont want to give the Donald any ideas ie. "sheisse" hole countries

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