Sign in to follow this  
Onyx

So apparently I garbage wrong?

Recommended Posts

Onyx

And I'm back with the domestic questions. I got a note from my landlord today that was very confusing but I'm guessing that my housemates and I are somehow doing the garbage... wrong? I need some help here because I'm used to SA's everything in a bag, on a day, and pray they are not on strike. Here, everything is far more complex. My housemates and I have been separating everything into kitchen scraps (food) and... everything else (mostly food boxes, packets, and polystyrene). Is this wrong?

 

I found a website that gave me this PDF with a... gray? bin. We don't have a gray bin; just a green one, and a blue one, and an ugly brown one. So, what now? Also, what is supposed to go into all of these? I'm sorry if this is glaringly obvious but I'm lost and if this is anything like Europe, I'm guessing he is getting snotty letters from the council.

 

Any help explaining this would be appreciated and also... how do I know when my garbage days are?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MaryJane

Hi Onyx,

Found this website with regards garbage collection days in Victoria. You are in Victoria, right? http://www.victoria.ca/EN/main/residents/garbage-recycling/garbage-collection-schedule.html You'll need to type your address in and it will tell you when the next collection day is. Normally you would take the garbage out the night before or very early on collection day.

Here in Mississauga, the green bin is for compost (kitchen food and stuff). Blue is normally for recycles (boxes, etc.). I suspect these colours would be the same but somebody in the same region as you could confirm. Brown here in Mississauga is for garden waste. We have black bags for anything else that don't go into the green, blue or brown bins.

Hope this helps. Happy sorting.... :-)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sideline

These are our rules, however they are pretty general in most places.

 

ACCEPTABLE ITEMS FOR YOUR BLUE CART INCLUDE:

  • Cardboard — flattened
  • Boxboard — cereal boxes, paper towel rolls, toilet paper rolls
  • Mixed Paper- junk mail, telephone books, paper bags, office paper, file folder, paper greeting cards, wrapping paper (non metallic)
  • Newspapers, inserts, and magazines
  • Waxy cartons — aseptic packages and waxy cartons (milk, juice, soy cartons)
  • Plastic Bags and bubble wrap — must be bundled into one plastic bag and tied
  • Clean Plastics with the recycling symbols #1 to #7, plus plastic beverage rings, plastic bottle caps, yogurt containers, shampoo bottles, margarine containers, fabric softener bottles.
  • Tin, aluminum foil, pie tins
  • Plastic Bottles and cans — we recommend residents return these to your local bottle depot for a refund or donate to local charities.
  • Shredded paper should be placed in a clear bag, tied and placed in the recycle cart

All of these items can be placed loose inside the recycling cart. Items that contained a food product or other item such as laundry detergent should be given a quick rinse then placed inside the cart.

 

Yes! All these items go into your green cart. 

Plate scrapings Scrape your plate into the kitchen pail at the end of a meal. 

Bread, noodles, rice, beans, grains

Meat, fish, bones, shellfish 

Eggshells & dairy products 

Fruits and vegetables 

Coffee filters, tea bags 

Jams, sauces, salad dressings and cooking oil 

Paper plates, napkins 

Kitty litter & pet waste (collected in a compostable or paper bag) 

Branches and prunings 

Should be smaller than 1 metre (3 ft.) and 15 cm (6”) in diameter, and placed inside either the green cart or a paper yard waste bag, or bundled separately with non-plastic string. 

Yard Waste 

Grass clippings and sod 

encourages you to leave your grass clippings on the lawn. Clippings will quickly decompose, returning
valuable nutrients to the soil. Leaving the
clippings on the lawn saves you time and is less

most everything else is garbage (black or clear bag)

The grey bin In your area appeas to be general garbage, so that's the above sentence.

http://www.victoria.ca/EN/main/residents/garbage-recycling.html

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jules

Sideline I thought the pet waste gets double bagged and then goes into the black garbage bag (and not recycled)?

Garbage is a complicated topic so I could be wrong. Surprised it hasn't been included in the citizenship test lol.

;-)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cathy K

Like everything else, each province and each town or city has its own rules.

In British Columbia used paper towels, paper plates and paper napkins also go in the green bin.

No garden refuse is allowed in any garbage. One has to take it to special bins at the garbage dumps.

As for doggy and kitty do; most town councils prefer that it isn't put in the garbage. We have special contractors who remove those and it cost quite a penny. No wonder all the Canadians take their dogs for a few walkies each day. There are (free) bins for disposal at every dog park.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
carolpalmer

 

I often opt for the non-plastic option, but there are times when one cannot simply avoid them. Say, for example, the food which comes wrapped in all-purpose plastic wraps. How do we dispose them? Recycling needs to be mentioned here as an eco-friendly measure in reducing the harmful impact of plastic on the ecosystem. Some articles say that (http://www.gorillabins.ca/blog/12-facts-about-recycling/) plastics take between 100 and 400 years to break down in the landfill. Using recycled material utilize only two-thirds of the energy needed to manufacture them from raw materials.

An effective alternative for plastic food wrap would be the traditional or old-fashioned organic cotton muslin infused with beeswax which is said to keep food fresher longer.

Have a recycle bin placed in a convenient position in your house. Remember one can get creative with trash producing creative designs with recycled plastics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Skylar360
On 3/15/2017 at 2:43 AM, carolpalmer said:

 

I often opt for the non-plastic option, but there are times when one cannot simply avoid them. Say, for example, the food which comes wrapped in all-purpose plastic wraps. How do we dispose them? Recycling needs to be mentioned here as an eco-friendly measure in reducing the harmful impact of plastic on the ecosystem. Some articles say that (https://trashcosolutions.com/bin-size-pricing/) plastics take between 100 and 400 years to break down in the landfill. Using recycled material utilize only two-thirds of the energy needed to manufacture them from raw materials.

An effective alternative for plastic food wrap would be the traditional or old-fashioned organic cotton muslin infused with beeswax which is said to keep food fresher longer.

Have a recycle bin placed in a convenient position in your house. Remember one can get creative with trash producing creative designs with recycled plastics.

This is good advice. Eco-friendliness is more important and therefore more enforced than ever before.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this