Sign in to follow this  
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

How do I find a job in Canada?

Recommended Posts

Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

Advice and guidelines provided by the Government of Canada:

Job Postings

find_job.jpg Job postings can be found in many places: on the Internet, on community bulletin boards, at job fairs or in newspaper help wanted sections.

  • A job fair is an event where businesses promote themselves and sometimes accept Definition ofresumes for job openings.

You can also contact Definition ofemployers directly to ask if they are hiring.

stop.gif IMPORTANT: You need a Social Insurance Number (SIN) to work in Canada.

Job Bank is the Government of Canada's electronic listing of job opportunities across Canada. You can search Job Bank by occupational title, availability and time of posting. The site also offers a Resume Builder and other tools. Job Bank is the largest Web-based network of job postings available to Canadians.

  • Over 900,000 new jobs are posted on Job Bank every year.
  • Up to 50,000 job postings can be accessed at any one time.
  • Up to 2,000 new jobs are posted every day.

Job search tools from Service Canada provide tools and resources to help you find a job, create a resume, choose a career, assess your skills and more.

Labour Market Contacts and Networking

Definition ofNewcomers may face challenges finding a job in Canada. Statistics Canada identifies four Definition oflabour market challenges faced by newcomers to Canada. One challenge is establishing labour market contacts and networking.

Newcomers may have trouble finding out about jobs because they do not have an established network of contacts.

The Hidden Job Market

Due to the time and cost of advertising a job (e.g. posting newspaper want ads, creating online job postings, etc.), many job vacancies are filled informally. This creates what seems like a Definition of"hidden" job market. Information about available work is often circulated through managers, Definition ofemployees and business associates, as well as through family, friends and acquaintances.

Networking is the way to search for jobs in the hidden job market.

For more information about the hidden job market and using your network, visit the Youth Canada Web site.

Organizations to Help You

There are hundreds of organizations to help newcomers adjust to life in Canada. These organizations can help you in many ways, including in your search for a job. For more information on Definition ofImmigrant Serving Organizations (ISOs) visit the Citizenship and Immigration Canada and the Service Canada Web sites.

For a list of employment services in Québec, visit the Emploi Québec Web site.

http://www.workingin...-eng.do?cid=203

Edited by Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

Work in Canada

Finding a job can take time. To succeed in this process, the key is to be prepared!

Finding a permanent job in Canada

Finding a job in Canada may be different from finding a job in your home country. New immigrants face some significant challenges when trying to get jobs in Canada:

You may also need to learn new job search skills, create a new group of contacts and find out what Canadian employers want.

http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/newcomers/work/index.asp

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

Work in Canada

Canada is actively seeking foreign workers and professionals to help grow the strong national workforce. Work in Canada is an important aspect of Canadian immigration.

http://www.canadavisa.com/canada-immigration-career-zone.html

Looking for Work in Canada?

Share on facebookShare on twitterShare on emailShare on printShare on gmailShare on stumbleuponShare on favoritesShare on bloggerMore Sharing Services

Canadian employers are actively seeking foreign skilled workers to alleviate labour shortages across industries from coast to coast.

Finding work in Canada can be one of the fastest ways to begin your life in Canada.

Your Work in Canada Options

It all starts with a job offer from a Canadian employer.

script_find.png Begin your Canada Job Search today! Browse our free Canada Job Search Tool and create and store your Canadian resume in the Canadavisa Resume Bank.

http://www.canadavisa.com/work-in-canada-job-seekers.html

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

How To Get a Job in Canada

ca_resume.jpg

Canada welcomes new migrants with valuable skills and qualifications, however searching for employment will be a challenge. It is important to be realistic and understand that you may not be able to find your 'dream job' straight away.

Dos and Don'ts

It is never easy searching for a job from overseas. Here is a summary of the do's and don't for overseas jobseekers in the Canadian employment market place:

http://www.migrationnews.com/canada/how_to_get_a_job

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

How do I Apply for a Job?

- Applying for a job involves three steps: a resume, a cover letter and company/job research.

Step 1) Develop a résumé

A Definition ofresume or curriculum vitae (c.v.), is an important tool when you look for a job. A resume tells an employer who you are, what you have done in the past, what your qualifications are, and why you want the job.

Resumes may include information under headings like contact information, job goal, education, work experience, and references. Visit Youth Canada's resource on writing a résumé to learn more.

Step 2) Writing a Cover Letter

A Definition ofcover letter is your introduction to a potential employer. A cover letter should be concise, well-written and tailored to a company and job. This may mean that you prepare a different resume and cover letter for each job. Visit Youth Canada's page to find out how to write your own cover letter.

Step 3) Company and Job Research

Learning about the Definition ofcompany and the Definition ofjob can help you write your resume, cover letter and prepare you for an interview.

http://www.workingincanada.gc.ca/content_pieces-eng.do?lang=eng&cid=201〈=en

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

The Govt. of Canada on:

Writing a résumé

Your résumé is one of the most important tools you have when looking for a job.

This page will help you choose the right type of résumé for your situation.

It will also provide you with tips to help you tailor your résumé to the job you’re applying for, and to make sure it stands out in a crowd for all the right reasons.

Types/examples of résumés here:

http://www.youth.gc.ca/eng/topics/jobs/resume.shtml

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

We have found using a Skills' Matrix or Skills Inventory of immense help in applying for work.

Here are some outlines provided by the Government of Canada:

Skills inventory

Before you try to convince an employer that you’re the person they need to hire, you should identify all the skills you have to offer.

It’s a lot harder to talk about your strengths if you don’t know what they are in the first place!

http://www.youth.gc.ca/eng/media/skills_inventory.shtml

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

Older WorkersOlder workers play an important role in the workforce, and contribute to Canada’s economic growth and long-term prosperity.

  • Targeted Initiative for Older Workers – provides employment assistance, skills upgrading, and work experience to unemployed workers aged 55 to 64 living in vulnerable communities across Canada, to assist unemployed workers aged 55 to 64 with their return to work.

  • How it Works
    TIOW is a federal-provincial/territorial cost shared initiative.
    Provinces and territories are responsible for the design and delivery of projects aimed at unemployed older workers in cities and towns that:
    • have a population of 250,000 or less; and
    • are experiencing ongoing high unemployment; and/or
    • have a high reliance on a single industry affected by downsizing or closures.

    To be eligible, participants must:

    • be aged 55 to 64*;
    • be unemployed;
    • be legally entitled to work in Canada;
    • require new or enhanced skills to successfully transition into new employment; and
    • live in an eligible community.
    *In some circumstances, unemployed workers aged 50 to 54 or 65 and over may also participate. http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/employment/employment_measures/older_workers/index.shtml

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

This is from a workbook compiled by the Foreign Credentials Referral Office:

Planning to work in Canada? An essential workbook for newcomers

Section C – Finding a job in Canada

Introduction

This section will help you understand all you need to do to find work in Canada. It provides you with essential steps to help you learn how to find and get the job you want in Canada. This process will take time, but completing each task below as thoroughly as possible will give you and your family members the best chance to achieve your career plans.

You may need Canadian work experience

Canadian employers, who often do not know how to assess education and work experience from other countries, may require or prefer you to have experience working in Canada. Getting that experience is one of the biggest challenges for newcomers.

Meeting people, getting advice, networking and volunteering are good ways to overcome this challenge, but it still may take time to get your first job in Canada.

To complete this section, first create your Working in Canada Report.

To learn more about employment standards, minimum wage, holidays, health and safety in the workplace, workplace equality, racism-free workplaces and Canada’s laws against discrimination, consult the Employment Standards section of the Labour website.

Step 1: Occupation

Knowing the proper Canadian name for the job (occupation) you want can help you avoid confusion with employers. To help you, Working in Canada provides job descriptions, other names for jobs, and other titles within your occupational group.

Step 2: Is this a regulated occupation?

There are two types of occupations in Canada:

  • regulated (including trades) and
  • non-regulated.
Review the Education & Job Requirements section of your Working in Canada Report. If your job is REGULATED, continue to Step 3. If your job is NON-REGULATED, proceed directly to Step 6.
HELP
If you want to work in a regulated occupation and use a regulated title, you must have a licence or a certificate or be registered with the regulatory body for your occupation in the province or territory where you plan to work.
About 20 percent of Canadian jobs are in regulated occupations. Each regulated occupation sets its own requirements for obtaining a licence or a certificate, usually through the provincial or territorial regulatory body or professional association. These jobs are regulated to protect public health and safety and to ensure that professionals meet the required standards of practice and competence.
If your occupation is non-regulated, employers will be interested in learning about your competencies, education and work experience to decide if you are suitable for a job. This information can be summarized in a résumé or Curriculum Vitae (C.V.) Employers may also be interested in the Canadian equivalency of your international educational credentials. A provincial credential assessment agency can assess your credentials for a fee.

Step 3: Who regulates?
Review the Licence and Certification section of your Working in Canada Report and take note of the name and contact information for the regulatory body or apprenticeship authority for the job and the province or territory you have chosen. This organization has information about the licensing, certification or registration that you need in order to work in that province or territory in that job. Write the name of the organization (or organizations) that regulates your occupation and the contact information for each, including the website address.
HELP
Regulated occupations are also called professions, skilled trades or apprenticeable trades.
Licensing requirements can differ in each province and territory. To find out if there is an advantage to choosing one destination instead of another, compare the licensing requirements for different provinces and territories.
In some regulated occupations, you can work in that field but you cannot use the regulated title. For example, you can work in accounting or finance but to use a regulated title, you must be a member of one of the organizations that regulates accountants in Canada.
Regulatory bodies are not labour unions or technical societies for members of a particular profession. They are also not employment agencies. They exist primarily to protect the public from the unsafe practice of a profession.

Step 4: Will I need to be certified or licensed or registered?
Consult the Education & Job Requirements section of your Working in Canada Report and review the licensing, certification or registration requirements for your occupation. (If the licensing process is not explained in your report, consult the regulatory body’s website).
List the requirements for registration, licensing or certification to work in that job in that province or territory and note whether you are qualified or not qualified, or whether you will need more information.
NOTE: If you cannot find the steps in the licensing or certification process for your regulated occupation in your Working in Canada Report, or on your regulatory body’s website, contact the organization directly.
Step 5: Getting certified or licensed or registered
Compare your qualifications to the requirements for licensing, certification or registration to work in that job in that province or territory.
Find out whether there are for your profession. These will tell you what you can do while you are waiting to come to Canada, guide you through the process of foreign credential recognition and outline the general requirements you must meet to work in your profession in Canada.
List information about examinations that you will have to pass.
Plan what you need to do to meet the requirements for licensing, certification or registration to work in that job in that province or territory. For each examination you must pass, make a list of the following:

HELP

You may need to go back to school to take more courses in order to be licensed to work in your occupation.

For each requirement that you currently do not meet, list the:

Make a schedule that shows the sequence of actions you will take.
Step 6: Main duties
Review the main duties in your Working in Canada Report and list the main duties for that job in the city and province or territory you have chosen.
Step 7: Job and skills requirements
Review the Education & Job Requirements section of your Working in Canada Report and list the requirements for that job. List the key requirements and note whether you are qualified or not qualified, or whether you will need more information.
NOTE: Information on employment requirements for a specific occupation may change or not always be available. Please check regularly for updates.
Step 8: Wages
Review the Wages section of your Working in Canada Report and note the typical hourly wage for that job in the city and province or territory you have chosen.
You may also wish to find out about
employment standards and labour laws in Canada.
NOTE: Information on wages in a specific area may change or not always be available. Please check regularly for updates.
Step 9: Outlook and prospects
Review the Outlook section of your Working in Canada Report to see what your chances of getting different jobs are in a specific location or across Canada.
Step 10: Job opportunities
Make a list of potential employers by:

HELP

Bridging programs can help you prepare and succeed in the licensing or certification process and in integrating into the Canadian workplace.

Bridging programs offer different services that could include an assessment of your education and skills, courses, practical or workplace experience, preparing you to take an examination for a licence or a certificate, language training for your profession or trade, individual action and learning plans to help you identify training you may need.

Contact the professional association or regulatory body for your profession, or a local immigrant-serving organization, to find out about programs available in the area where you plan to live.

You may also find a potential employer by asking an about a “Job Search” training session or workshop or by asking for information from the in your community. Names and contact information for more immigrant-serving organizations can be found through an Internet search for “Canadian immigrant-serving organizations.”

You might want to track the following information for potential job opportunities:

NOTE: You will find more job opportunities when you consider broader occupations. Your skills are transferable to other occupations and sectors that you may not have considered. See for more information.

Step 11: Continuing education and training information

Formal training in the field you are interested in might help you find work. Consider going back to school to obtain a diploma or certificate, upgrade your education or complete a training program. You may also wish to know about opportunities to continue your education in a field other than the one you intend to work in when you arrive in Canada.

There are several ways that you can research the continuing education and training opportunities available to you in Canada to qualify to work in the job you want in the city and province or territory you have chosen.

You might want to track the following information:

NOTE: Information on continuing education, training or study programs in a specific area may change or not always be available. Please check regularly for updates.
Step 12: Other jobs
If you plan to work in a regulated occupation, it may take some time to complete all the actions in the plan you outlined in
Steps 4 and 5. In the meantime, you may want to find out about other types of jobs so that you have more options for working in Canada. These alternative jobs may or may not be related to your current job or your skills and education.
Since it takes time to get licensed in your profession, you may need to work in a job related to, but not in, your profession while you wait for your licence. Working in a related job will give you an opportunity to:

You may decide to stay in an alternative job or, if the alternative job is related to your current job, use this experience to help you get licensed in your original occupation.

How?

HELP

There are many Service Canada Centres across Canada. Each centre offers a range of services for federal departments and agencies, other levels of government and community service providers. Examples of services offered include applying for employment insurance, a passport and a Social Insurance Number.

Step 13: Other jobs not in my field

You may want to consider working in a job that is not related to your profession if:

  • You are interested in changing careers
  • Job opportunities in your profession are not available
  • You need to find any kind of job immediately
  • Your credentials are not equivalent to Canadian standards or it would take too much time, effort and money for you to meet the standards
How?
  • List other jobs NOT in your field for which you may be qualified and then complete additional Working in Canada reports to find out if these other jobs are regulated or non-regulated.
  • If you are in Canada, you may also contact a Service Canada Centre in the city or province or territory in which you live to make further inquiries.
  • You can find other contact information in your Working in Canada Report.

HELP

If yours is a regulated occupation, it can take a long time to get licensed, registered or certified if you were trained and educated outside of Canada. You might want to work in a non-regulated occupation in your field first. This can be a good way to use your skills and get Canadian work experience.

Step 14: Action

Plan what you need to do to meet the requirements to work in that job in the city and province or territory you have chosen.

How?

Use the information in Step 7 for each requirement that you do not meet or that you need to improve.

Estimate the cost and how long it will take you to meet each requirement.

Make a schedule that shows the sequence of actions you will take.

Step 15: Prepare a résumé and cover letter

In Canada, a résumé or curriculum vitae (CV) is an important tool in the job-search process. Along with a cover letter, it tells an employer who you are, what you have done, what your qualifications are and why you want the job.

The style used for résumés in Canada might be different from what you are used to. For example, you should not include personal information such as age, marital status, gender, religion, Social Insurance Number (SIN), political affiliation or immigration status. You can prepare a great résumé while you are still in your home country. To learn more about writing a résumé and preparing a cover letter, visit the following websites:

NOTE: You will need to create a free account with a user name and password to access the Résumé Builder section of the Job Bank website.

HELP

You may also ask an about a résumé writing” training session, workshop or service. Names and contact information for more immigrant-serving organizations can be found through an Internet search for “Canadian immigrant-serving organizations.”

Step 16: Prepare for a job interview in Canada

An interview is a meeting between you and your potential employer, often with set questions and answers. An employer will often interview several qualified applicants for a job.

HELP

Some interviews may include a multiple choice test. To learn how to prepare for this type of test search the Internet for “multiple choice test tips”.

You can learn more about how to prepare for a job interview by:

Step 17: Volunteering

The term “volunteering” means performing a service willingly and without pay. Working as a volunteer can help you:

  • get Canadian work experience;
  • practise English or French;
  • build your network of contacts;
  • make friends and meet Canadians;
  • find someone who will be a reference for you; and
  • show potential employers that you are a hard worker.
Learn more about how volunteering in Canada can help you find a job by:
  • searching the Internet for “Volunteer” and the name of the city;
  • asking for more information from an immigrant-serving organization. The names and contact information of more immigrant-serving organizations can be found through an Internet search for “Canadian immigrant-serving organizations”; and
  • visiting Volunteer Canada for an overview of volunteering.

Make a list the volunteer opportunities in Canada that are of interest to you.

Step 18: Start your own business

If you are thinking of starting your own business in Canada, you will need a detailed business plan. You can learn more about starting a business in Canada by:

Before you continue:

If so, complete another by changing the occupation, the location, or both, and then fill in another copy of this workbook. You can then use different reports and workbooks to compare options. For example:

If not, continue and complete the other sections of the workbook.

http://www.credentials.gc.ca/immigrants/workbook/sectionC.asp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

Working in Canada Tool

The Working in Canada Tool can help you make well-informed decisions about where to live and work by producing a report that contains information on job descriptions, wages, skills, language training and job opportunities tailored to your needs.

> Enter a job title: Go to http://www.credentials.gc.ca/jobs/wic-tool.asp to produce your personalized work tool.

The Working in Canada Tool is managed by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

Looking for a job in Canada - We can help in your job search!

Job Hunter Resources

pxl_trans.gif

http://www.find-a-jo...m/employee.html

Safety Tips for Job Seekers:

While the vast majority of job opportunities are valid, it is important for job hunters to take precautions when applying for jobs. We recommend that you refuse any job offer that involves:

  • Using your personal bank account, including forwarding money, agreeing to deposit cheques or money orders, or having money wired into your bank account.
  • Paying money out of your own pocket, such as paying a fee to learn the details of a job or obtain a background check.
  • Re-shipping products because it often involves stolen credit cards and victims will spend their own money on the shipping and are "reimbursed" with counterfeit cheques or money orders.
  • Divulging personal information, such as birth date, social insurance number or driver's licence or passport details.

Find A Job Canada has a strict policy of not accepting job postings which require that the applicant pays a fee. Please inform us immediately if you are asked to do so on any job posting on our site. You can contact us via email at: Find-A-Job-Canada.com.

Edited by Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

Video presentation :

Find a job in canada - how to make it happen. Dr. Lionel Laroche at IEP Toronto Feb 10 2012

Uploaded on Feb 15, 2012

In deph analysys of the Canadian labour market and the challenges

that people face when moving to Canada.

dr. Lionel Laroche - Hard skills vs. soft skills, at the IEP conference Toronto, Feb 10 2012

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

Video presentation :

Find a job in canada - how to make it happen. Dr. Lionel Laroche at IEP Toronto Feb 10 2012

Uploaded on Feb 15, 2012

In deph analysys of the Canadian labour market and the challenges

that people face when moving to Canada.

dr. Lionel Laroche - Hard skills vs. soft skills, at the IEP conference Toronto, Feb 10 2012

This video is worthwhile watching as it gives one a very good understanding with re. to what skills are needed for the Canadian labour market.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

2013 Napp Job Fairs in Canada:

About Napp Canada Jobfairs:

Napp Canada is a Canadian owned company and a leader in job, employment, and training events for connecting businesses to skilled professionals quickly. Napp Canada believes in strategically empowering companies and people to realize their full potential by giving them the right environment to connect though its well organized events.

Established with over 7 years of operational capabilities, NAPP Canada has a track record for organizing Job Fairs, training and employment events. We can boost of our over 100 successful career fairs and employment events. In our last fall jobfair events we hosted a record number of 360 exhibitors. Employers and jobseekers must be sure not to miss participating in these results driven events that delivers a quality which outperforms other jobfairs. Employers, go with what works, and what fits your schedule. Go with job fairs that have high yields at a practical cost that actually fit into your budget.

Employers, act now and register for the jobfairs.

We registered over 360 exhibitors for our fall 2012 evernts. We are going bigger, and accommodating over 100 exhibits at each location, Our current SPRING 2013 Jobfair and Training dates are as follows:

1) Etobicoke, Woodbine Centre Mall: Thurs. Jan. 17, 2013

2) Scarborough GKM Community Centre: Wed. Jan. 30, 2013

3) Mississauga - Toronto Airport International Centre: Wed. Feb. 20, 2013

4) Hamilton Convention Centre: Wed. April 17, 2013

5) Toronto, Roy Thomson Hall: Wed. March 20, 2013

6) Scarborough GKM Community Centre: Wed. May 15. (Career, Education, Apprenticeship and Trades Fair event)

http://www.nappcanada.com

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jack Sparrow

Thanks, think this thread should be pinned.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Merv

Thanks, think this thread should be pinned.

Pinned as requested wink.gif (well done, btw Ingrid!!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

Pinned as requested wink.gif (well done, btw Ingrid!!)

Thanks Merv. It's a pleasure to help with info.

To start the process is always daunting.unsure.gif Helps to then have some info that can get folks going in the direction they need to.

Besides, I like learning by researching. smile.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

Study while you wait...

Study while you are waiting for your application to be processed and earn some Canadian credits/certification/diploma/degree through Athabasca University in Alberta.

Information for international students?

As an international student, you may enroll in a program of study that leads to a university credential provided you have met the entrance requirements. Simply complete Athabasca University's General Application Form, indicating your program of choice, and submit the one-time non-refundable application fee. You may also apply as an unclassified or non-program student.

Browse Athabasca University's courses and programs, and register at least one month in advance of your intended start date. View our Fee Schedule for information on applicable fees.

For more information on available options for becoming a student at AU, visit theStarter Kit page of our website, as well as our undergraduate and graduate calendarshttp://www2.athabascau.ca/contact/askau/index.php?question=Do+you+have+information+for+international+students?&type=top

International Students

If you are not a Canadian citizen or permanent resident of Canada, and you plan to remain in your home country while you complete your AU program, you can follow the same application process as Canadian students. Please select one of the following choices:

If you are not a Canadian citizen or permanent resident of Canada, and you plan to reside in Canada while you complete your AU program, here are the steps to follow:

  • Ensure you have a current Study Authorization.
  • For undergraduate studies, print out the Undergraduate General Application Form (PDF) and fill out the required information. Fax the completed form to AU at 1-780-675-6174, or mail it to<br style="line-height: 1.22em; ">Athabasca University<br style="line-height: 1.22em; ">1 University Drive<br style="line-height: 1.22em; ">Athabasca, AB, Canada<br style="line-height: 1.22em; ">T9S 3A3
    For graduate study, contact the centre which offers the program in which you wish to enrol by calling 1-800-788-9041 (toll-free in Canada and the U.S.).

You will receive confirmation of admission with your AU student ID number. Once you have received your confirmation of admission, you may register for courses by following these simple steps:

  • Review program requirements and choose your courses. If you need help in deciding which courses to choose, contact an advisor.
  • Log in to myAU using your student ID number and click on Register for a Course. Register for the courses you've chosen.
  • Pay your course fees.
  • You’ll receive confirmation of your course registration within two weeks.http://www.athabascau.ca/students/starter/international.php

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

NOC Codes are of extreme importance as you have to list the code that best describes your occupation.

What are NOC Skill Types and Skill Levels?

The NOC classifies occupations on the criteria of Skill Type and Skill Level.

The first digit of the NOC code identifies the Skill Type of an occupation which indicates the broad area of work. For example, Health Occupations start with the digit 3. Management Occupations, which are found across all Skill Types, from 1 through 9, start with the digit 0.

The NOC classifies occupations on one of four broad skill levels identified as A through D. These levels correspond to the kind and/or amount of training or education required for entering an occupation. Please see the NOC Introduction for further details.

Occupations in Skill Types 1 through to 9 are classified under Skill Levels A, B, C or D. The second digit of the NOC code represents the level as follows: A = 0 and 1, B = 2 and 3, C = 4 and 5, and D = 6 and 7. Management occupations, which span all Skill Types, are included in Skill Level A as shown in the NOC Matrix 2011.

Skill Level A represents occupations usually requiring university education. Skill Level B refers to occupations usually requiring college education or apprenticeship training. Skill Level C occupations generally require completion of secondary school and some job-specific training or completion of courses directly related to the work. Skill Level D occupations usually require some secondary school, on-the-job training, short demonstration sessions or instruction that takes place in the work environment.

http://www5.hrsdc.gc.ca/noc/english/noc/2011/FAQ.aspx

Index of Titles - NOC Code Search

http://www5.hrsdc.gc.ca/noc/english/noc/2011/SearchNocCode.aspx

Welcome to the National Occupational Classification 2011

The National Occupational Classification (NOC) 2011 is the authoritative resource on occupational information in Canada. It is used daily by thousands of people to understand the jobs found throughout Canada's labour market. Learn more about the NOC 2011.

The NOC 2011 updates both the National Occupational Classification 2006 of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada and Statistics Canada’s National Occupational Classification for Statistics (NOC-S) 2006. This revised edition eliminates the differences between the two former systems.

HTML format

PDF format

More information

http://www5.hrsdc.gc.ca/noc/english/NOC/2011/Welcome.aspx

Occupational Structure by Skill Type

Consult the NOC Tutorial for additional information on Classification Structure. Select the desired skill type below to access the detailed Occupational Structure.

NOC 2011 Occupational Descriptionshttp://www5.hrsdc.gc.ca/noc/english/NOC/2011/QuickSearch.aspx?val65=*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

Looking at work in Ontario?

Here is a website that gives guidelines on how to find a job:

http://www.ontarioimmigration.ca/en/working/OI_HOW_WORK_JOB.html

City of Ottawa on how to find a job:

http://ottawa.ca/en/residents/social-services/immigration/finding-job#P8_282

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

This may be good for children of residents who are already in Canada and who want to learn a trade:

Canada is experiencing skills shortages, leading to higher wages and more jobopportunities in a large number of trades.

This site will help you discover the facts about a career in the skilled trades and how an apprenticeship can help you.

Choosing a trade

With more than 200 trades across Canada to choose from, finding the right one can seem challenging.

Here are some tips to help you identify what would be a perfect career choice for you.

http://www.careersintrades.ca

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

Some additional Job Search Sites:

General Job Search Sites

Canada’s Top 100 Employers

http://www.canadastop100.com/

Eluta – The Search Engine for New Jobs in Canada

http://www.eluta.ca

Government of Canada Careers

http://jobs-emplois.gc.ca/index-eng.htm

Monster Canada

http://www.monster.ca

Possibilities: Toronto’s Online Employment Resource Centre

http://www.poss.ca

Top 100 Internet Sites for Learning and Job Searching

http://www.jobboom.com/conseils/top100A.html

Accounting Job Search Sites

Certified Management Accountants Society of British Colombia

http://www.cmabc.com/

Institute of Chartered Accountants Alberta

http://www.albertacas.ca/Home.aspx

Institute of Chartered Accountants B.C.

http://www.ica.bc.ca/kb.php3?

Institute of Chartered Accountants Manitoba

http://www.icam.mb.ca/

Institute of Chartered Accountants Nova Scotia

http://www.icans.ns.ca/

Institute of Chartered Accountants Ontario

http://www.icao.on.ca/

Institute of Chartered Accountants Quebec

http://ocaq.qc.ca/home.html

Institute of Chartered Accountants Saskatchewan

http://www.icas.sk.ca/

Certified Professional Accountants

http://www.cma-quebec.org/en.aspx

Society of Management Accountants Canada

http://www.cma-canada.org/

Society of Management Accountants Ontario

http://www.cma-ontario.org/

Certified General Accountants Association of Manitoba

http://www.cga-manitoba.org/home.aspx

Certified General Accountants Association of New Brunswick

http://www.cga-nb.org/en/home.aspx

Certified General Accountants of Ontario

http://www.cga-ontario.org/

Certified General Accountants Association of Prince Edward Island

http://www.cga-pei.org/home.aspx

Certified Professional Accountants of Quebec

http://cpa-quebec.com/

Advertising, Marketing & Communications Job Search Sites

Advertising Age

http://adage.com/

Marketing Magazine

http://www.marketingmag.ca/

Outdoor Advertising Association of Canada

http://www.oaac.com/

Strategy Magazine

http://strategyonline.ca/

Biotechnology Job Search Sites

Biotechnology Human Resource Council

http://biotalent.ca/default_e.asp

Construction/Trades Job Search Sites

Construction Sector Council

http://www.csc-ca.org/

Toronto Construction Association

http://www.tcaconnect.com/Home.html

Education and Teaching Job Search Sites

Education Canada Network

http://www.educationcanada.com/

Jobs in Education

http://jobsineducation.com/

The Manitoba Teacher’s Society

http://www.mbteach.org/

Ontario Secondary School Teachers’ Foundation

http://www.osstf.on.ca/

Engineering Job Search Sites

Canadian Technical Employment Network

http://www.cten.ca/

Ontario Association of Certified Engineering Technicians and Technologists

http://www.oacett.org/page.asp?P_ID=98

Environment Job Search Sites

CanadianEnvironmental.com

http://www.canadianenvironmental.com/

Health Job Search Sites

Canadian Nursing Index

http://www.nursingindex.com/

Canadian Society for Epidemiology and Biostatistics

http://www.cseb.ca/

Canadian Society for International Health

http://www.csih.org/en/opportunities/jobopps.asp

Opticians Association of Canada

http://www.opticians.ca/

Information Technology Job Search Sites

Canada Computer Work

http://canada.computerwork.com/

Canada’s Association of Information Technology Professionals

http://www.cips.ca/

International Webmasters Association

http://www.iwanet.org/

Information Technology Association of Canada

http://www.itac.ca/

Webgrrls International

http://www.webgrrls.com/

Insurance Job Search Sites

Manufacturing Job Search Sites

Wood Manufacturing Council

http://www.wmc-cfb.ca/

Mathematics and Statistics Job Search Sites

Canadian Mathematical Society

http://cms.math.ca/Employment/

Statistics Society of Canada

http://www.ssc.ca/en/jobs

Oil and Mining Job Search Sites

Petroleum Services Association of Canada

http://www.psac.ca/career-resources

Science Job Search Sites (see also Biotechnology Job Search Sites)

Chemical Institute of Canada

Information provided by:

Canada’s most popular job search sites

By Denise Hansen<br style="border: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; ">August 15, 2012

http://canadianimmigrant.ca/guides/canadas-most-popular-job-search-sites

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

Here's a great workbook:

Planning to work in Canada?

An essential workbook for newcomers

This workbook will help you gather information about living and working in Canada. Download it and fill it in to help you to obtain the greatest benefit from your experience and education.

Please note that being accepted to come to Canada does not guarantee you employment in Canada in your preferred job or any other job. This workbook is not tied to any immigration or visa application process for coming to Canada.

Download

You will need a

PDF reader to view the following document(s).

Planning to work in Canada? An essential workbook for newcomers

(PDF, 5 Mb)

If you plan to live and work in Manitoba or British Columbia, download these versions instead:

http://www.credentials.gc.ca/immigrants/workbook/index.asp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this