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Snowflake

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Traveller

Driving south across the 13km long Confederation Bridge (longest bridge over ice covered water on the world) you get to the province of New Brunswick, the only bilingual province in Canada.

After a while, you reach the Bay of Fundy. This photo is the bay shore between Mocton and Saint John, in the south-east of New Brunswick.

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Detail of the "canyon wall" in Fundy National Park, low tide. Here you'll find some of the biggest tides anywhere.

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Turning north-west, here is an example of local architecture - a house in downtown Fredericton.

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Further on, an autumn scene in Mount Carleton National Park, in the north of the province.

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Next stop: Quebec

Please feel free to share your photos these provinces (or other parts of Canada) in this thread as well!

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Louis & Marion

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Sunset at the outskirts of my home town, northwest of Saskatoon.

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An Orthodox Church at dawn, close to Pike lake, Saskatchewan.

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Crocusses blooming on the banks of the North Saskatchewan River, barely 2 weeks after the snow started melting in earnest.

Edited by Louis & Marion

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Snowflake

Hi all

The pics all of you post on here are absolutely amazing! Have a few myself I'd like to post but they seem to all be apparently too large... Not being a technical wizard I can't post them but still adore looking at yours!

Snowflake

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Traveller
Hi all

The pics all of you post on here are absolutely amazing! Have a few myself I'd like to post but they seem to all be apparently too large... Not being a technical wizard I can't post them but still adore looking at yours!

Snowflake

Hi Snowflake

I had the same problem, but it is easily solved - if you have your own webspace somewhere.

Find the solution in the following thread: Technical > Forum Help > Attachments

Christo

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Snowflake
Hi Snowflake

I had the same problem, but it is easily solved - if you have your own webspace somewhere.

Find the solution in the following thread: Technical > Forum Help > Attachments

Christo

Hi Christo

Thanks for the assistance, will definitely try and figure it out.

Dedri

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Snowflake

All Torontonians....

No more good pics of Toronto and surrounding areas out there? How about Niagra etc.etc?

S.

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Liz

Some unexpected visitors in my garden...raiding the birdfeeders. There were three of them...looked like young ones. Cute, eh?

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Traveller
No more good pics of Toronto and surrounding areas out there? How about Niagra etc.etc?

Toronto and Vancouver are okay and pics are welcome, I've lived in both, but as Happystones said, there is much more to see in Canada than those two cities ;-)

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Traveller

Québec is the second most populated province in Canada and the heartland of modern French-speaking Canada. Coming from Northern New Brunswick, you can easily cross into the remote Gaspé region of the Province. The best sites are in the east of the region - but we only went as far east as the town of Bonaventure, where there is a very interesting museum of the early Acadian French settlement in Canada. A Viarail train service runs between Québec City and the town of Gaspé. This is French territory. You won't hear much English around these parts, and you may not even be well understood should you try and speak English. (I haven't tried Afrikaans, but if it is anything like France, you may be better off :holy:)

This is a rural scene on the way to Bonaventure in the southern Gaspé.

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To get to the main part of Québec, you have to cross the mighty St. Lawrence River; Fleuve Saint-Laurent. It is 50km+ wide in parts, and there are few bridges, but several car ferries. We chose to cross at the Riviére-du-Loup crossing, hundreds of kilometers west of Bonaventure. At Saint-Siméon on the north shore, we turned north-east again and continued on to the stunning "Parc Québec du Saguenay". The weather was pretty misrable (not good for photos), but even so small towns such as L'Anse-Saint-Jean is worth a visit. Anyway, here is a gray sunset over the Saguenay.

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After a visit to the area, we turned back south-west towards Québec city. On the way, the small town of Baie-Saint-Paul (and the island of L'ile-aux-Coudres) are must-see stops. Baie-Saint-Paul is one of the five prettiest Canadian towns imo - we'll visit the other four later on. This photo shows some of the colourful Thanksgiving/Holloween decorations in front of an art gallery.

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Travelling through the more heavily populated areas of Québec, you will eventually reach the ski resort of Mont-Tremblant in western Québec, by the provincial park of the same name. You can easily feel like you are in a ski resort in the Alps, except for the North American cars. I made many fall (autumn)-colour photos in the park, but here is a river-scene detail.

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Perhaps someone else has more photos they want to share. The Gaspé is a huge region, showing only one picture does not do it justice. But Quebec is a huge province, and my webspace here is limited. For a few more of my Québec photos, see here: and here:.

From Mont-Tremblant it is not far to the next province, Ontario.

Edited by Montxsuz

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Karen

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Misty pic from the Cabot Trail, Nova Scotia last week.

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Traveller

On to Ontario, the sixth province in our tour so far. Before moving to Vancouver, we lived in Ontario for over a year - the economic heart of Canada. (Though due to the decline in manufacturing, its economy is not growing as fast as those in the west.)

Sunset. Coming across the Ottawa River from Gatineau, Québec, there is this church in downtown Ottawa (Outaouais in French) near the art museum. The city is quite bilingual.

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Going west, then south, the Algonquin Provincial Park is about halfway between Ottawa and Toronto. This huge park has only one road through a small corner of it, and if you want to see more, you will have to rent a canoe, or walk. Surprisingly, they allow hunting in the park for a few weeks in the autumn, so watch out for people in camouflage and orange fluorescent vests. :blink:

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An unusual view of Toronto, from Toronto island. Notice two landmarks: the tower and the stadium.

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There are losts of Niagara Lake photos around, so here is something different. A view across the Niagara River (toward the USA), with a slow shutter speed on a breezy day in fall, at sunset. This is between Niagara-on-the-Lake and Niagara Falls.

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The quaint town of Niagara-on-the-Lake, not to be confused with Niagara Falls, the tourist trap, is another one of the five prettiest small towns in Canada imo. You are in the heart of Ontario wine country now, and I think you'll need deep pockets and a strong liver to live around here. Close enough to the big smoke, I knew people who commuted to Toronto from here.

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Stratford, in south-west Ontario, is another one of the five prettiest small towns in Canada (three so far). It is a few hours west of Toronto. Stratford is on the Avon River, and hosts a big and well-known Shakespeare festival every year, lasting about six months. The picture is a park in downtown Stratford.

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Again, Ontario is a huge province, and webspace here is limited. For more of my Ontario photos, see earlier in this thread, and here and here. From Stratford, it is a short drive to Detroit Michigan, but a long, long drive north, then a long, long drive west to get to Manitoba, the next Canadian province to the west. Take the train - seriously. Continuing the journey, I'll start posting photos of the western provinces in a few weeks, when we return from a vacation. Hopefully by then, there will be a lot of new pics from other members below this point ....

Edited by Montxsuz

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Traveller

Continuing my overland trek from east to west across Canada, started in a previous thread, we reach the Prairie provinces. Just across the border from Ontario, the landscape suddenly changes - it becomes flatter and flatter as you travel west. The province of Manitoba was settled by Ukrainians and Icelanders, amongst others. The province is also home to the Metis, a mostly French-speaking mix of Europeans and Native Americans. In 1870, their leader Louis Riel negotiated for Manitoba's entrance into the Canadian confederation. Fifteen years later he was hanged after an uprising against the Canadian military. Today is a a bit of a hero, and Winnipeg is full of monuments and tributes to him. In addition, First Nations people are probably more visible in Winnipeg than other large Canadian cities.

Like before, I will try to select a small variety of images, however there are many parts of Manitoba I have not been to. For example, I have been wanting to go to Churchill (Hudson Bay shore) for a long time, but I seem unable to plan my availability ahead for the optimum season. October and November (ie right now) are the polar bear season in Churchill, but these months are usually fully booked at least a year in advance (at premium rates). One day ....

Keep in mind that the driving distance from coast to coast in Canada exceeds 7,200 km - if you stick to the highway (we don't). If you would drive for 8 hours a day, that would take more than 11 days to cover. Winnipeg is about halfway. Every time I go to Winnipeg something seems to go wrong (missed connection, lost luggage, bad accommodation, extreme weather, etc), but it is actually not a bad city. Some call it the Chicago of Canada - due to the interesting architecture. This is the view of downtown from the railway station.

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Winnipeg has also been called "Windypeg", "Winterpeg", "Whinypeg" etc. The winter weather in Winnipeg can be quite extreme. -50c with windchill (esp on Portage and Main ;)) - or colder, in winter. At least this was a sunny day.

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But you can have fun no matter what the weather brings. The park at the Forks (near the railway station again) is full of snowboarders, skaters and hockey players on many winter days. There is a good market nearby, and just across the river is St. Boniface, the French speaking area of Winnipeg - with some great restaurants.

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Unfortunately I don't have many photos of rural Manitoba handy. Please feel free to add more photos below. This is the small town of Virden, about 300km west of Winnipeg.

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Saskatchewan next ....

Edited by Traveller

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Traveller

Continuing westwards. Right now Saskatchewan's economy is one of the most vibrant in Canada. Mining (oil, potash) and agriculture are some of the main sectors. Original settlers included people from the Jewish and Mennonite faiths, Francophones, Scandinavians, and Ukrainians, but on a recent trip I heard Afrikaans spoken even in small towns.

I have a soft spot for Saskatchewan. It reminds me of where I grew up (the Free State) - plus snow. Flat and grassy, ie prairie. Replace the buffalo skull with a cattle skull, and this photo might as well have been taken in the north-western Free State.

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Approaching Regina from Manitoba, the road passes through Indian Head (south-east). This is a grain silo taken from a moving vehicle. Grain is another thing this province has in common with the Free State, though the silos back where I grew up look quite different.

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The Wanuskewin Heritage Park north of Saskatoon is quite worthwhile to visit. I was there at the end of November, and was treated to First Nation dancing without having to cope with crowds. They offer interpretive tours and walks, and the restaurant offers yummy traditional food.

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I defintely like Saskatoon better than Regina. I can see myself living there, though I am unsure about jobs in my line. It seems a modern, pleasant city, but weather-wise winters could be challenging. Partial skyline of Saskatoon.

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The prairie continues on through Alberta, up to the foothills of the Rockies.

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Traveller

A couple of years ago you just needed to be able to fill out an application form to be offered a job in Alberta. Who knows how the 2008 economic downturn will affect that.

Though the oil sands are up north, Calgary is the oil capital of Alberta. Sort-of the Houston, Texas of Canada. A spread-out city with good public transport, Calgary is third in Canada for Corporate headquarters, i.e. they have more corporate headquarters than Vancouver, BC - a larger city. Edmonton (a few hours north) is the administrative capital of the province. Edmonton has (or used to have) the largest shopping mall in the world - it is quite a sight. There is talk about building a high-speed railway line between the two cities. I don't have photos of Edmonton handy, but here is a partial skyline of Calgary from a recent trip - an oil company office tower taken from across the railway tracks.

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The Banff National Park is only a couple of hours away from Calgary - imo one of the best reasons to live in Calgary. A frequent visitor, I prefer Jasper to Banff - more laid back - but Banff sure offers some great views. The drive between the two national park towns is certainly an experience not to be missed, doesn't matter what time of the year it is. I am limiting myself to 4 photos per post here, but if you like to take wildlife pictures, it is dead easy in the Rocky Mountains National Parks. Mountain sheep, goats, deer, birds, etc - though I have not bumped into a bear yet. Mount Rundle, near Banff, at sunset:

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In winter you find mountain goats eating salt (used for de-icing roads) off the roads. But ever wondered what people do in the Rockies in winter? Skiing and cross-country skiing of course. Hiking - if you are crazy like me. Ice climbing if none of the above appeals. Here are a few guys climbing a frozen water-fall in the Rockies in sub-zero temperatures.

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The people of Vulcan, Alberta (south of Calgary) obviously have a sense of humour ....

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In this vicinity there are large wind-power farms, in contrast with the large oil-sand projects in the north. Not to be missed is the Waterton Lakes National Park on the US Border. Stop in at "Head Smashed In Buffalo Jump‎" on the way there. From here it is only a short distance to British Columbia, our next province, using the southern route.

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dieulefit

Just when I thought the political news of the world is so depressing this morning that I wanted to crawl back into my bed, let the shutters down, throw the blanket over my head and forget about this place... then these spectacular pictures!! THANKS Christo! You should meet my son one day, who happens to be your name-sake and like you, also a keen photographer of nature. I now feel approximately encouraged :).

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Mad about Canada

thank you all for keeping our hearts warm with these beautiful photos....please do keep them coming!

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hennie_dup

Stunning photographs! Can't wait to do the same trip one day...

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Traveller

Dankie almal vir die pluimpies, ek is bly iemand geniet dit om na die fotos te kyk - ek geniet dit om hulle te neem. Die volgende aflewering ...

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Traveller

Due to the Rocky Mountain barrier, there are only 3 or 4 main routes from Alberta into British Columbia (my current home province). They are all quite scenic, provided you get good weather and clear skies. For example, as a frequent traveller to Jasper, I have only once seen Mount Robson (at 3,954m the highest peak in the Canadian Rockies).

Should you cross the border at Banff AB, you will pass Yoho NP, one of many National and Provincial Parks on the western (BC) side of the border. This is Emerald Lake in winter, popular with cross-country skiers and snow-shoers at this time of the year - you won't find many hikers in winter - we were the only crazy ones I saw. In summer,the lake is well, emerald in colour, rather than winter-white.

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The southern route into BC through Cranbrook is less scenic, but it takes you through Nelson, a delightful town, and the fourth of the five small art towns in Canada.(I mentioned three of those in previous posts, the fifth is coming soon). I last visited Nelson in early spring (March), but it was still reasonably lively, taking into account that tourism shuts down in winter in much of Canada.

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Leaving Nelson and travelling west, you soon reach Osoyoos. Near the US Border, Osoyoos is the southern tip of BC's wine and fruit growing area. It is also part of what is considered to be the only desert in Canada. Deserts in Canada? Well, for someone used to Australian or African deserts it did not look very "deserty" to me, in comparison. But the area does has a certain Karoo-like beauty to it. And very relaxing. Do visit Nk'Mip, the First Nations-run winery. A view from downtown Osoyoos:

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Ignoring Vancouver for a moment (you can't really, but many photos have been posted elsewhere), you can catch a ferry to the Gulf Islands (between the mainland and Vancouver Island) from Tsawwassen. Salt Spring Island is the most popular. It is considered one of Canada five small art "towns", and indeed many artists and crafts people live and work here. However, I have to say that we were rather underwhelmed; we found it less pretty compared to the other four (Baie St. Paul, QC; Stratford, ON; Niagara-On-Lake, ON, and Nelson, BC). Ganges is over-rated imo, and frankly we were more impressed with a few nearby towns on Vancouver Island, for example Duncan and Chemainus.

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Victoria, the quaint capital of BC is worth a visit, especially in early summer when the Bouchart Gardens attract heaps of tourists. I allowed my wife to drag me along to go and look at flowers, but I wasn't sorry. You can spend hours looking - or photographing - all kinds of flowers. The gardens are organized into international themes.

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Tofino is a must-see destination on Vancouver Island. It is isolated, beautiful and fairly unspoiled - much of the area is protected by the Pacific Rim National Park - though a lot of development is happening at the moment at nearby Ucluelet. Known for big Pacific storms, we travelled to Tofino at night through mist and dense fog over (what felt like) searing mountain-passes, while the rain was bucketing down. A harrowing experience. But the next morning, we woke up to sunshine, blue skies, and beautiful beaches. Mackenzie Beach, Tofino, at sunset.

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There is much more to see on Vancouver Island, and I have gone as far north as Port Hardy, but my space is limited. So perhaps others will contribute more photos. Taking the ferry to the mainland from Courtenay/Comox, you reach Powell River on the Sunshine Coast. Unfortunately, we haven't seen much "sun" on the Sunshine Coast, but did travel north as far as the main road goes. It the main coastal north road ends about 25km north of Powell River at Lund (founded by Swedish settlers in 1889), the end/start of Highway 101, which runs 15,020km all the way south to Puerto Mont, Chile. So Lund is where the coastal road ends - to visit the settlements further north (e.g. along the beautiful Desolation Sound), you have to travel by boat. Travelling south to Vancouver by road (it takes two more ferries), there are plenty of pretty bays and villages worth visiting, for example Garden Bay and Secret Cove. But here is a west-north view from Lund toward Vancouver Island.

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Travelling to Northern British Columbia via the inland route, you reach Prince George and Prince Rupert, halfway to the Yukon border. You can also reach Prince Rupert (on the coast) from Jasper (in the Rockies by train, which is exactly what I did. Travelling along this route, you can see the massive amount of damage done by pine beetles to BC's forests. A problem caused by climate change, the pest is slowly moving east. This photo was taken somewhere along the way (near Prince George), showing what central inland BC looks like.

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From Prince Rupert, you can reach Port Hardy on Vancouver Island by ferry. More interesting is taking the ferry to the Queen Charlotte Islands. Best of all is taking the ferry to Alaska...

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Traveller

Bonus photos of BC: Back to Vancouver, our home of the last three years.

Firstly I wanted to display an image from a live webcam transmitting from above Burrard bridge (i.e. not one of my pics), between downtown Vancouver and Kitsilano. The image is refreshed every 5 minutes (but the "live" part of the webcam shuts down after dark after which it displays the last image captured for the day). However, it is "verboten", dynamic images are not allowed on SACanada any longer, it seems. So here is a link to http://www.katkam.ca/pic.aspx. Check out the sunsets - and fireworks in summer. The traffic jams. As an example, here is tonight's last photo. The camera angle changes from time to time, but we used to rent a house somewhere near the top, centre of this view (near Jericho Beach, Kits).

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Looking in the opposite direction, a panorama of the Vancouver skyline. I created it from 26 separate photos (taken from Jericho Beach, Kitsilano). Sorry, it was yet another cloudy Vancouver day, so the mountains are "missing". Mind you, it took about six months after moving to Vancouver before we believed that there were actually mountains here in Vancouver. It was the wettest winter on record, that year. Most rainy days in a row (I forget how many exactly, but about 60, except for one cloudy, but dry day, on day 43). All the rain makes spring beautiful (green and heaps of flowers), and summers are generally pleasant as well. Right after the autumn colours in October (about now), the rain starts all over again, until about May. But three out of four ain't bad. See here for Vancouver fall colours.

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Wreck Beach, UBC campus: A "clothes optional" (nudest) beach near Jericho Beach (i.e. near where we used to live). Unlike Australia, such spectacles are hidden away from public view in Canada. Oh, btw. I've decided not to include any people on this photo, and no webcam here either, sorry. :lol: Still, one of the nicer beaches in Vancouver.

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Lastly, a view of Vancouver downtown's condo-filled skyline, taken last Christmas from my decorated condo (apartment) balcony.

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Almost there...

Edited by Traveller

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Traveller

Yukon epilogue. Many people take a cruise from Vancouver to Alaska. That is fine, but sitting on a large cruise ship along with thousands of others and with organized entertainment is not really my idea of fun. More exciting and adventurous is taking the normal scheduled ferry service. When I did this 20 years ago, I sommer slept on the deck - and was nearly carried away and eaten alive by mosquitos.

By now you already know that is has been a long time since I last visited the Yukon - but I still remember it vividly. The western Yukon is a place of stunning beauty. The Kluane National Park (near the coast) has the highest point in Canada (at 5,959m). Right now I don't have access to all my old photos, but here are a couple of the photos I took in the vicinity at the time.

The Elias Mountains, Kluane National Park, Yukon, between Beaver Creek and Haines Junction. Temperatures in this area can change between +35C in summer and -65C in winter - that is a 100 degrees Celsius differential.

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Along the Alaska Highway, Kluane National Park, Yukon.

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Anyway, I hope people found this "travel blog" of 11 Canadian provinces and territories interesting. This is the last episode. There won't be another soon, as I have not been to the remaining two provinces/territories of Canada as yet (Northwest Territories and Nunavut), and I am not planning a trip soon.

But to put all the above into perspective: To travel coast to coast by road from St. John's, Newfoundland to Victoria BC is over 7,200 km - if you don't turn off anywhere. From Victoria BC to Beaver Creek, Yukon it is almost another 3,200km by road. So in this thread I have described a trip of over 10,400km across 11 (out of 13) provinces and territories of Canada - 10,400km plus many side-trips - in just over 50 photos. That is about 1 photo for every 200kms, on average. There aren't many photos of the north, and my photos don't do justice to the beauty and wide expanses of Canada, but hopefully they give an overview of the variety of scenery that can be found across Canada, and encourage others to see Canada - cause that is what we are here for!

That's it. Someone else's turn next. Thanks for viewing my pics - do travel in Canada - and have fun!

Christo

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jen1

Thanks for putting this together Christo, stunning pictures and a lovely "view" of Canada.

Edited by jen1

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rockwooder

Vreeslik dankie, Christo, maak mens sommer lus om die stapskoene aan te trek. Hoop om sommer nog baie van die mooi land te sien (sal darem nie net van stapskoene gebruik maak nie).

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mariusl

Dankie Christo,

jou fotos is regtig uitstekend. Ek het dit baie geniet. My hart trek eintlik so 'n punt Kanada toe.

Miskien eendag sal ek ook die land kan verken.

Marius

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Vanessa

Absolutely stunning, I really enjoyed this thread. Thanks Christo

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