Sign in to follow this  
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

BC:An Attractive Immigration Destination:

Recommended Posts

Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

Provincial Nomination Feature of the Month

In Canada, both the federal government and the provinces have a say in the selection of immigrants. The federal government is fully responsible for health and security issues and exclusively administers some immigration programs such as Family Class Sponsorship and the Federal Skilled Worker category of immigration. Many of the provinces administer their own immigration programs and do in fact select candidates who express an interest in settling within their territory under what is known as the Provincial Nomination Program (PNP).

As labour shortages are becoming increasingly common across the country, the provincial governments have been taking more responsibility for ensuring that there is enough population and labour force growth to sustain their economies. The dynamics of the PNP's are changing across the country and immigration under the PNP Class is becoming one of the most attractive options for Canadian immigration. Provincial nomination shortens the immigration application process considerably as provinces are keen to have their newcomers settle and begin work in the province as soon as possible.

Starting with this issue, one Provincial Nomination Program will be covered in depth in each monthly edition of the CIC Newsletter. This month, the focus is on British Columbia.

British Columbia : An Attractive Immigration Destination

British Columbia (BC)'s booming economy is creating more employment opportunities than the current provincial labour force can meet. Over the next twelve years, there will be one million job vacancies in BC, only 550,000 of which can be filled by current BC residents, based on existing demographics. The solution to the province's human resource challenge lies in increased and improved immigration, according to BC Premier, Gordon Campbell. "We have to find people who can move into the workforce," states Campbell. "We need people from all walks of life. We need them in entry-level jobs, we need them in tourism, we need them in jobs in agriculture, we need them in jobs in high-tech, jobs in health care, jobs in construction."

Recognizing this reliance on immigration and acknowledging the shortcomings of past policies, the BC government has implemented its Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) to select potential immigrants who can generate significant economic benefits to the province. Those selected are eligible to apply to Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) for their Canadian Permanent Residency under the Provincial Nominee Class, fast-tracking their application’s processing.

The BC PNP comprises two main components: the Strategic Occupation component and the Business component.

Strategic Occupations Component of the BC PNP

The Strategic Occupations component contains three categories (Skilled Worker, Designated Health Professional, and International Graduate). Only those applicants who have obtained an offer of employment from a BC employer are eligible to apply under Strategic Occupations. Requirements vary in each category; in a nutshell, the requirements for the applicant, the employer, and the job offer are as follows:

The applicant must have a permanent, full-time job offer from a reputable BC employer in a skilled occupation listed in skill type 0 or skill levels A or B in the National Occupational Classification (NOC) Matrix. The current demand and future outlook for the occupation must be favourable and the hiring of the applicant must bring significant economic benefits to BC. The candidate must possess the necessary education, training, and work experience for the job and must demonstrate the ability to become economically established in the province (according to income and work prospects, English language proficiency, number of dependents, and any other connections to the province through family, work, or study). The BC employer must meet certain criteria regarding history and operations and must demonstrate that the position could not be filled by Canadian residents. The employer is also responsible for ensuring the offer of employment satisfies PNP requirements regarding rate of pay, hours of work, etc.

1- The Skilled Worker category is for those applicants whose BC job offers fall under skill type 0 (Managerial), or skill levels A (occupations usually requiring university education) or B (occupations usually requiring post-secondary education or apprenticeship training) in the NOC Matrix.

2- The Designated Health Professional category is designed specifically for registered nurses, registered psychiatric nurses, physicians, or midwives who have an offer of employment in BC. Registered nurses and physicians are generally recruited through regional and provincial health authorities. In order to be nominated by BC, a registered nurse must be eligible for registration with the College of Registered Nurses of BC (CRNBC) or the College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of BC (CRPNBC). Physician nominee candidates must have already practiced medicine in BC for at least nine months on a work permit, and have received a positive assessment from a supervising physician, as evidenced in a letter from the College of Physicians. Midwife nominee candidates must demonstrate that they are eligible for registration with the College of Midwives of British Columbia (CMBC). They must also obtain a Letter of Confirmation from a reputable practicing group, which confirms that they have been accepted for a period at least six months as an affiliated midwife.

3- The International Graduates category is aimed at recent graduates of recognized British Columbia post-secondary institutions, who have completed the required portion of their degree/diploma in BC. The candidate is required to have an offer of employment from an established BC employer, which must be permanent, full-time, and in a skilled occupation. The applicant must possess all the required qualifications for the position. The PNP application will need to be made within one year of the date shown on the applicant's final official educational transcript. The applicant will also need to list a reference faculty member or senior administrator from their BC academic institution on the application.

Business Component of the BC PNP

The Business component also consists of three categories (Business Skills, Regional Business, and Projects).

1- The Business Skills category is geared for those applicants with successful business experience looking to be actively involved in the implementation of a new BC business. A business plan must be presented for a project that will create at least five new job positions in the province and in which the applicant will play a managerial role. There are minimum requirements for financial resources, investment, equity, and work experience. The candidate must invest a minimum of CAD$800,000 and have a minimum net worth of CAD$2 million.

2- The Regional Business category was created to enable the rapid implementation of a new business or the expansion of an existing business that will contribute to the province's regional development. The project, for which the applicant will take an active managerial role and which will create at least two new jobs in BC, will need to be located outside of the Greater Vancouver Area. Again, there are minimum requirements for financial resources, investment, equity, and work experience. The candidate must invest a minimum of CAD$300,000 and have a minimum net worth of CAD$600,000.

3- The Projects category enables the timely entry of key managers and technical professionals, who are considered essential to the success of a BC business. The category is only for new business expansions or investments and requires a minimum financial investment of CAD$1 million. The investment must also create five new jobs.

Under both the Strategic Occupations and the Business components, BC Provincial Nominee candidates receive accelerated temporary work permits so that they can settle in the province without delay. Once confirmed as Provincial Nominees, their Canadian Permanent Residency applications are fast-tracked.

In confronting the labour shortfall in British Columbia, Premier Gordon Campbell encourages immigrants to make Canada their new home: "This country was built by people who work hard, whether they are from China, or Eastern Europe, or Asia or Africa. If you're willing to work hard you can make a future in Canada."

Source: British Columbia Government; The North Shore News

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry

Ingrid,

to be honest, the picture I have, is the following:

A. The provincial government needs businesses set up outside the GVRD ( Greater Vancouver Regional District)..read "small interior towns" with "tough business prospects".e.g. Merritt/Lillooet/ Cache Creek etc

B. They need "blue collar" and "minimum wage" employees in the established areas...Vancouver, Prince George, Kelowna, Abbotsford.

In the professional domain, people are still being kept out of practising in the larger centres by a combination of government rules and professional association protectionist tactics.

As for the high tech folks; they are still being laid off in Vancouver. Despite what the government says, BC is NOT a High Tech Heaven at this time. It was brutally decimated by the DotCom bust and faith has not yet really returned. The BS "Green" story around Ballard and its never ending Fuel Cell research without ever producing a darned product cannot go on for another ten years. It has already had to lay off droves of people, including SA emigrés that I know. Just because Gordon Campbell ( BC PRemier) and Arnold Schwarzenegger got together to dream up the Hydrogen Highway, does not mean there are hordes of jobs for Electrometallurgists in Battery R&D. It just means there are jobs for people who can cast concrete and jobs in Ontario for folks who assemble Toyota Hybrids actually created in Japan.

This is my problem with the Canadian "political correctness" thing: They basically want truck drivers and folks to man the tills, but they don't want to say so. So people with PhDs in chemistry land here in good faith and cannot get jobs. They should be going to Fort MacMurray in Alberta to find their feet, and come to BC later when they DO have ground under their feet and can negotiate a job from a position of strength.

Just trying to be pragmatic here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
chrissteyn

After living in BC (Vancouver Island first and Vancouver after that) for 5 years and Calgary for one, as well as some stints in the Interior of BC, I must say that I prefer Southern Ontario for a few reasons:

1. Weather etc:

Like Durban in the summer, only MUCH warmer. Sunny, even in the Winter. Winters are mild, like in Coastal BC, minus the constant rain. People seems much more driven, more like living in a major metropolitan area in SA as opposed to say Knysna.

Much better ooportunities for children in every respect.

2. Work

There is absolutely NO comparison with BC when it comes to professional opportunities. They are MUCH more available here and the fact that you were educated in a ex-commonwealth country where people speak reasonable English actually counts for something.

3. Cost of Living

Much lower. Our 2 acre property, complete with lakeview and sandy beach, swimming pool etc, cost less than $600 000, and virually everything else is cheaper.

4. Travel

Ther is something to be said for leaving home at lunch and sitting on a beach in the Carribean at 17:30, all at less than $800 per person for a long weekend!

Why do South Africans not come here in droves: I think just because all off the hype surrounding Vancouver and Region's weather, which is KIND OF WET!. Don't get me wrong thoug, I am NOT saying Vancouver is not a stunning city: Just stating the alternative

PS: Driving to work this winter. On the radio there is a big announcement that all schools will be closed, public offices shut down etc due to extreme cold weather as it will reach minus 12. Anyone wo ever liuved in the prairies will know exactly how ridiculous this sounds : WINTERS HERE IS REALLY ACCEPTABLE. Am sitting next to my pool this pm in 23 degree weather. Try that in Calgary in MAy!!!!

Contact me for any advice - I have pretty much worked everywhere in Canada at some point INCLUDING Rural Quebec

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shireen
After living in BC (Vancouver Island first and Vancouver after that) for 5 years and Calgary for one, as well as some stints in the Interior of BC, I must say that I prefer Southern Ontario for a few reasons:

1. Weather etc:

Like Durban in the summer, only MUCH warmer. Sunny, even in the Winter. Winters are mild, like in Coastal BC, minus the constant rain. People seems much more driven, more like living in a major metropolitan area in SA as opposed to say Knysna.

Much better ooportunities for children in every respect.

2. Work

There is absolutely NO comparison with BC when it comes to professional opportunities. They are MUCH more available here and the fact that you were educated in a ex-commonwealth country where people speak reasonable English actually counts for something.

3. Cost of Living

Much lower. Our 2 acre property, complete with lakeview and sandy beach, swimming pool etc, cost less than $600 000, and virually everything else is cheaper.

4. Travel

Ther is something to be said for leaving home at lunch and sitting on a beach in the Carribean at 17:30, all at less than $800 per person for a long weekend!

Why do South Africans not come here in droves: I think just because all off the hype surrounding Vancouver and Region's weather, which is KIND OF WET!. Don't get me wrong thoug, I am NOT saying Vancouver is not a stunning city: Just stating the alternative

PS: Driving to work this winter. On the radio there is a big announcement that all schools will be closed, public offices shut down etc due to extreme cold weather as it will reach minus 12. Anyone wo ever liuved in the prairies will know exactly how ridiculous this sounds : WINTERS HERE IS REALLY ACCEPTABLE. Am sitting next to my pool this pm in 23 degree weather. Try that in Calgary in MAy!!!!

Contact me for any advice - I have pretty much worked everywhere in Canada at some point INCLUDING Rural Quebec

Hello

Give us the name of a few towns we can check on the internet. My husband wants to be close to water,

but also something with good business prospects.

I don't think there is a PNP for Ontario though, is there?

Regards

Shireen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Four Geese

We have also been thinking of finally settling in Southern Ontario. Yes please suggest some nice and affordable areas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Des & Talitha

Hi For Geese,

Why dont you have a look at the following areas. Waterdown, Ancaster, Burlington. 45 min south of Toronto and 45min to Niagra Falls. We live in Ancaster and are very happy here. Stunning weather in the summer and reallly mild winters. Close to the States and the Lakes.

The reason why we chose Ancaster (a lot smaller than Burlington and Waterdown) Stunning upmarket town with that village feeling. Have the best shopping for miles around, with good schools.

Remember the closer to Toronto the more expensive the houses. For me personalllly I rather have a bigger house and and travel a bit more than live in a smaller home just to be closer to Toronto. Also remember a lot of people find work in places like Oakville, Mississauga, Hamilton.

Hope this helps

Talitha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ingrid Brunkhorst Hurrell

Immigrant cash

By Tom Fletcher

Jun 22 2007

The B.C. government is using new federal funds to ramp up English language training for adult immigrants, to help fill thousands of job vacancies that are expected over the next decade.

Premier Gordon Campbell and Attorney General Wally Oppal announced a program called WelcomeBC in Vancouver last Wednesday.

It will provide $43 million over the next two years to help immigrants become fluent in English and find jobs that use their skills.

The program is expected to reduce wait times for beginner and advanced language training, assist refugees settling in B.C. and help immigrants land jobs.

http://www.surreyleader.com/portals-code/l...1211&more=0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Karen

Southern Ontario has many lovely areas , which have been mentioned above.

Also consider Aurora, Barrie, anywhere around Lake Simcoe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
coldenuforyaeh?
After living in BC (Vancouver Island first and Vancouver after that) for 5 years and Calgary for one, as well as some stints in the Interior of BC, I must say that I prefer Southern Ontario for a few reasons:

1. Weather etc:

Like Durban in the summer, only MUCH warmer. Sunny, even in the Winter. Winters are mild, like in Coastal BC, minus the constant rain. People seems much more driven, more like living in a major metropolitan area in SA as opposed to say Knysna.

Much better ooportunities for children in every respect.

2. Work

There is absolutely NO comparison with BC when it comes to professional opportunities. They are MUCH more available here and the fact that you were educated in a ex-commonwealth country where people speak reasonable English actually counts for something.

3. Cost of Living

Much lower. Our 2 acre property, complete with lakeview and sandy beach, swimming pool etc, cost less than $600 000, and virually everything else is cheaper.

4. Travel

Ther is something to be said for leaving home at lunch and sitting on a beach in the Carribean at 17:30, all at less than $800 per person for a long weekend!

Why do South Africans not come here in droves: I think just because all off the hype surrounding Vancouver and Region's weather, which is KIND OF WET!. Don't get me wrong thoug, I am NOT saying Vancouver is not a stunning city: Just stating the alternative

PS: Driving to work this winter. On the radio there is a big announcement that all schools will be closed, public offices shut down etc due to extreme cold weather as it will reach minus 12. Anyone wo ever liuved in the prairies will know exactly how ridiculous this sounds : WINTERS HERE IS REALLY ACCEPTABLE. Am sitting next to my pool this pm in 23 degree weather. Try that in Calgary in MAy!!!!

Contact me for any advice - I have pretty much worked everywhere in Canada at some point INCLUDING Rural Quebec

I agree with the above - Spring was a compete write-off here in Vancouver while out east has been basking in sunshine all along.

As for jobs, Harry seems to have this place figured out. This economy is driven by low-wage/blue-collar jobs . The competition for good white-collar jobs can be tough because the locals are overeducated, ambitious immigrants from all over are streaming in, and there simply isn't a large enough services sector outside of the GTA. I think this disproportionately large pool of candidates also keeps salaries at they very modest levels they are despite the surge in the economy. Now if you're a doctor, nurse or pharmacist getting off the boat, they're prepared to pay you a decent wage to sustain a greying underproductive population!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
shaun

How did I manage to miss this topic ?

I would have had a moderator put an end to it long time ago.........you guys are giving away all the good (secret) destinations for immigrating to Canada :o:D;)

coldenuf, are you meaning labourer jobs or Blue Collar jobs. They both work in blue collars, but I can point out a number of machinists, millwrights and electricians that are on par with what my doctor earns here in the GTA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Four Geese
Hi For Geese,

Why dont you have a look at the following areas. Waterdown, Ancaster, Burlington. 45 min south of Toronto and 45min to Niagra Falls. We live in Ancaster and are very happy here. Stunning weather in the summer and reallly mild winters. Close to the States and the Lakes.

The reason why we chose Ancaster (a lot smaller than Burlington and Waterdown) Stunning upmarket town with that village feeling. Have the best shopping for miles around, with good schools.

Remember the closer to Toronto the more expensive the houses. For me personalllly I rather have a bigger house and and travel a bit more than live in a smaller home just to be closer to Toronto. Also remember a lot of people find work in places like Oakville, Mississauga, Hamilton.

Hope this helps

Talitha

Dear Talitha

Sorry I only read your post today. Thank you for the recommended areas to look. I would also rather live out of town and travel to work.I am in the Pharmaceutical Industry and have been told that there are a few Pharma Industries in Mississauga?. Will definately explore this area in September during a LSD trip.

Thank you again.

FG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this