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Tabbie

Doctors!

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Tabbie

Check out what other people say about our doctors

The Canadian Provinces are listed about ½ way down the page. Just click on the correct one for your location.

http://www.ratemds.com/canada/index.jsp

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Hendie

Very useful link Tabbie. I added it to our links page as well.

I had a look on their forum too. Seems it's getting a lot of negative reaction from doctors. There is even talk of legal action against the site owners. Interesting.

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CharleneK

Yep, Hendie, it is a useful link. And yes, it's true that many doctors are up in arms over it. Personally, my own opinion of many doctors will not be fit to print. Of course, there are the very good ones too, as RateMDs.com will attest. And most fortunately, my name doesn't appear on it!

Just remember; critising your doc on RateMDs.com is anonymous, and therefore "safe." Doing the same on this forum (I mean criticising a doc by name rather than the profession as a whole) may get you in trouble, as you can be identified.

Of course, Hendie, Ann and others will tell you that criticising doctors as a group on the forum is likely to trigger quite a bunch of trouble from certain quarters :lol: . However, I cannot really defend (or blast) doctors as a group. I just tend to come up for the Art and Science of Medicine (after all, it pays my mortgage).

Charlene

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Ann

I found the following comment on that forum rather interesting:

A friend of mine had a difficult pregnancy and delivery, being looked after by an obstetrician who specializes in high-risk pregnancies. She said he made her feel very relaxed during the delivery by making jokes, while skilfully doing his job. Someone else I know who had the same doctor and who also ended up with a healthy baby vowed never to see that doctor again because "he was joking the whole time and didn't take my condition seriously".
Obviously the ratings are subjective, not objective. Edited by Ann

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CharleneK

That's so very true. The quality that you admire most about your doctor may be what the next guy hates most about him or her. Half my patients used to love the fact that I never made them wait (compulsively punctual, you see). The other half hated that I never waited for them... :lol:

Charlene

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Moonstones

Doing a quick search under 'V' in Saskatchewan shows a whole bunch of

Van der Merwe

Van Heerden

Van Eeden

Van Zyl et cetera ;) Shows you how many Sefeffricans there are out there :lol:

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Karen

Teachers have much the same kind of site, where kids can rate us.

It seems that if you like a teacher/doctor and he or she has done well for you, of course you write good things. It has absloutely no bearing on that person's abilities.

Reading through some of the doctor ones, I see comments like, "He really listens and can tell a good joke." Well, great stuff, but does that make him a fantastic doctor? Perhaps, if you believe that laughter is the best medicine! My own doc, who had only one comment, only rated a 3.2. She is slow and takes her time, so this person does not like waiting, she does not have a bubbly, outgoing personality, so she fell down on that, and most unfairly, her knowledge was rated as only so- so. The person who wrote that comment should only know how lucky she is to have a doctor who is actually quite brilliant, very caring ( in her own quiet way), has specialised in internal medicine too, and who is open- minded about alternative treatments and not just dogmatic about going the allopathic route. She is a gem and to only give her a 3.2 is totally subjective.

Then, I read comments about another doctor I know who is really awful ( my own opinion, of course- he could not even read an ECG or see a heart attack happening in front of his nose), but his patients seem to love him. Go figure!

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Ann

I trust that you gave your doctor a five to balance things a bit.

Edited by Ann

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Karen

I certainly did. She is now up to a 4.2

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vinceb

Possibly not true anymore but told to me many years ago as a joke:

Two doctors qualified at the same time, A was brilliant and ended up with the Medal for the most outstanding student in medicine, B barely scraped through. They both set up practices as family physicians and two years later, B had a thriving practice and A was struggling to make ends meet. He swallowed his pride and went to see B and painfully explained his predicament and asked for advice.

B led him to the window and said: "Do you see the people out there? 90% of those people are clueless about medicine and they come to see me, the other 10% who are clued up and can appreciate your brilliance, go to you."

or as a friend once told me in somewhat coarser terms:

"Bulls..t baffles brains"

Never underestimate the power of a good bedside manner. And the important fact is that a family physician must actually like people. I remember asking an orthopaedic resident why he decided to do orthopaedics and his answer was bluntly put : " I dislike people!"

Given the intense competition to be selected for medical school, only the very bright and dedicated will make it, and these are often those people who are by their very nature somewhat reclusive and very singleminded and spend a lot of time studying and certainly not socializing. At the same time medicine is a very closed club (in south africa ) and given the high demands of medicine when training, medical students seldom mix outside their group or have time to spend acquiring other knowledge about life or developing other interests outside medicine. They often end up as educated barbarians.

The perceived lack of life skills and knowledge about people is seemingly addressed in Canada. So you may end up with a group of highly trained professionals who know very little about people and the dynamics between people. I believe most of them start with high ideals but you end up mostly seeing people at their very worst, and lets face it, who when ill feels witty or intelligent or happy? Sooner or later unless you really like people, cynicism sets in.

I repeat that it is important to really like people and care about them - you cannot fake it for ever.

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dieulefit

I know someone who really struggled to finish his medical studies, but all he ever wanted was to be a doctor! You would perhaps not like him at first (personality wise he is an ;):huh::unsure:, but he is an EXCELLENT Physician and especially with the elderly and children.

You know, it goes for any profession and it is not the Doctors really who are in trouble, it is their profession, right! I am living currently in a town, which actually just recently became a City to be correct and 35 thousand people in my City has NO direct access to a Doctor - almost half of everyone living here! Of the number of Physicians available here, one after the other is closing their Practises because they are in any case ready and or past their retirement age! When they go, their Practises are just closed - nobody to take over and all their patients left without a Doctor... . I have to drive an hour to my Doctor I had when we first came to Canada. If I was not satisfied with her, I would not be able to get in with another Doctor. They will ask you, in putting your name on a waiting list for another Physician, if you have a Doctor currently and if the answer is yes, out of luck pal! This is totally unacceptable to me. Something needs to be done seriously. For a 1st World Country, this is rediculous to sit in Emergency for nothing less than 6-8 hours before you are being looked after.

If I may ask - who of you know anyone here in Canada whose child is studying to become a Doctor? I happen to know three - two are from Calgary (one Canadian and one x-South African), BUT one is studying in Calgary, one in Vancouver (now busy with Pediatrics and close friend of my son and daughter-n-law) and the X-South African (whose parents are both Doctors in Calgary) is studying medicine in Australia, because he could not get into Med. School in Canada! I know SEVERAL young people studying medicine in South Africa - SEVERAL! What the $$#@ is wrong with the system in Canada? :angry:

I like my Doctor and thankfully, over the years have build up a bond with her (I know I am very lucky), but I can see that she is getting tired - she is as thin as a plank and her marriage recently failed as well. I KNOW she is overworked and even though she is now taking one day a week off, she is working harder than ever to make up for the day she is taking off AND her practise is suffering because of that as well. There are no easy solutions here, BUT for this Government to wake up and put a for sure plan on the table that will work! There are ways (we bloody well all know about it and have talked about it and for way too long and too much as well) to cut for example waiting times at Emergencies at Hospitals, to get surgeries done quicker and to bring the shortage of Doctors back to a level that a 1st World Country should have. JUST DO IT!

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Karen

My 23 year old son has a herniated disc pressing on a nerve. He is in need of surgery to correct this painful issue, however he cannot get to see a surgeon in this city for 15 months!! Once he has the consultation, he will probably have to wait a further year or more for the actual operation. And this is first world medicine?!!! All the best orthopaedic docs trip the light fantastic off to the US, when they make mega bucks and live like kings, and who can blame them? If my son could get into ANY surgeon, I would not give a fig about his/her bedside manner - I would just want him fixed up and pain free.

So, here we are in Canada, with a young man who is swallowing anti- inflammatories ( not good), having expensive physiotherapy ( not covered by the govt health plan) and who is now awaiting an epidural cortisone shot from a pain doctor in a few weeks' time. All these invasive and expensive methods just to keep him going until he can see a specialist. If we lived in SA, or Australia/NZ, the US, he would have had whatever he needed long ago already and not had to suffer. We are thinking of taking out a loan against our home and taking him to the US, but why should we have to spend thousands of dollars to have medical treatment out of country when we pay high taxes here and should have the benefit of first world living in something this important?

Canada might be a great country, but it's medical system is sick. If you stay healthy here, all is fine, if not, be aware, very aware. ;)

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Merv

There is a new phrase these days re this situation, "Medical Tourism", people are going to countries like Mexico, Cuba, NIcaragua etc for first rate medical care at bargain basement prices (don't scoff at Cuba, they have some of the best medical personnel in the world)

Might be worth considering for your son (yeah I know we pay taxes and should get the care here, but if we aren't getting it, then maybe take the bull by the horns?

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shaun

It's strange how the medical wheel turns....

USA is getting a lot of Candian doctors.....

Canada is getting a lot of SA doctors......

SA is getting a lot of Cuban doctors......

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vinceb

There are several problems with the supply of family physicians in Canada and some are self-inflicted:

In the early 1990's there was a predicted future oversupply of physicians and the number of trainee physicians posts at medical school were slashed by 20% and it is only over the past 5 years that the numbers have been restored and given the long period of training, the numbers will only start to make a dent in the numbers of physicians by 2010 - 2012.

Canadian positions for residents (and everybody has to specialize and that includes family practice,) just about match the numbers of medical students who apply from Canadian medical schools. Even Canadian born citizens who study medicine elsewhere struggle to get a position as a resident and have to sit out the first round and wait for an available position in the second round. In contrast the USA has about 140 positions for residents available for the 100 or so USA trained medical students who apply.

You can imagine that a medical student who passes medical school in another country finds it easier to write both the Canadian and USA qualifying exams and will often decide to rather apply in the USA for a position as a resident and might eventually decide to stay there after qualifying as a family physician or specialist. Many foreign trained graduates often decide to go this route rather than hang on hoping to find a position as a resident trainee.

Like SA about 50-55% of medical school students are female and the Canadian Medical Journal from time to time supply figures about the willingness of doctors to work long hours and it is insightful that the doctors who work the shortest hours are female followed by young males and the group who are prepared to work longer hours are usually the 50+ group. This makes nonsense about the projected need for doctors since these factors are never taken into account.

Add to this that people are living longer and their medical needs become correspondingly more and you have a problem. There is also the clear perception by patients that they have the right to be healthy all the time and to access the medical system as they see the need to without the need to be responsible about their lifestyle. The present overweight generation of young people are more likely to suffer from diseases such as diabetes, joint disorders and cardiovascular diseases and are much less active than their parents.

An immediate solution would be to increase the amount of resident trainee positions at medical schools and to specifically target the group where the greatest need is and in my opinion that would be family physicians. This would enable foreign trained physicians who are at present excluded, to become part of the system and increase the numbers of family physicians.

Edited by ckotze

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Ann
Add to this that people are living longer and their medical needs become correspondingly more and you have a problem.
This type of statement has been made at least a couple of times on this forum. But is it really true?

I noticed looking at the hymnal that included the date of birth and death of the composer of the hymns that most of the hymn writers lived to a ripe of age, e.g. 80+, 90+ etc. These hymn writers lived centuries ago before the 'benefit' of modern medicine. So I wondered why the statement that people live longer nowadays was being made as it didn't seem to be accurate.

I think the following article: Lifespans: have we be looking in the right place explains it quite well, i.e.

By not discounting infant mortality, the data on average lifespans in cultures and times without the benefit of modern public health measures have been skewed downward drastically. I recall in my youth hearing figures being thrown around about an average lifespan for an ancient Roman of around 30 years, which made it seem to the casual observer that it would have been rare to see middle-aged or old men in Rome.

This was not the case; a more realistic picture of longevity is gained by looking at the average age at death (excluding war) of adults. That is, recording only the average age at death of all who have passed the hazards of firstly childbirth, and secondly disease in infancy and childhood, which is where truly great advances in survival have occurred in modern culture.

The real issue facing us is the silver tsunami, i.e. the baby-boomers hitting old-age. It's not about them living longer, it's' that there will be a lot more of them than their predecessors.

Edited by Ann

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CharleneK
I noticed looking at the hymnal that included the date of birth and death of the composer of the hymns that most of the hymn writers lived to a ripe of age, e.g. 80+, 90+ etc.

I do not believe that looking at hymnals is a scientific or statistically valid way of assessing longevity of the general poulation a few centuries ago. It just proves that a few individuals who wrote hymns lived quite a long time...

Charlene

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Ann

Well, it is amazing that they managed to reach that age without modern medicine. Is there any proof that they were the exception? I doubt that they were the exception. Even back in David's time the average age when an adult died was between 70 and 80 years of age.

The days of our years are threescore years and ten; and if by reason of strength they be fourscore years, yet is their strength labour and sorrow; for it is soon cut off, and we fly away. Psalm 90:10

WOW, the longevity of Adam, Noah etc. without antibiotics etc. is truly amazing :unsure: How did they manage to live so long. ;)

Adam lived to 930 years of age; Methuselah to 969; Noah to 950. This is of course in marked contrast to the modern situation.
Edited by Ann

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vinceb

I have just read a book on Julius Caesar's life and you be surprised at how many women died in childbirth in those days. Life was a lot rougher and more violent in the Roman Empire for the average joe. Peasant farmers who made up the bulk of the population were only left out of the army if they had an income which was below a certain level and the ones who joined the legions often came back poverty stricken since wars often lasted several years and by the time they came back their farms had scarcely produced an income for several years - as now, the wealthy had better access to good food and medical attention then.

I can easily believe that the average lifespan for a woman was 30 years and a male 40 years then.

We accumulate a lot of wear and tear as we become older - becoming older is not for sissies. We live faster paced lives, do less physical exercise and eat more refined food than our parents did. Luckily medical science has advanced rapidly and has the ability to keep us alive for much longer - if we can find a doctor :unsure:

Diabetes is a good example - the recognized need to keep a blood sugar well below what was considered necessary years ago, now means that the complications of diabetes can be delayed for several years. The same applies to bad cholesterol, although the goalposts in cholesterol and the treatment appear to shift every few years.

The ability to diagnose disease has improved so rapidly the past two decades that there are some diseases that we frankly do not seem to be sure as how to treat and whether they should be treated in the early phase.

I'm not even going to get into immunization since I know that you feel strongly about it ;) - peace Ann!

vince

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patche

I have a different question on doctors in BC - maybe someone can clear this up for me...Me and hubby has been seeing our "family" doctor for almost two years - on average only about once or twice a year. My kids never needed him up until now (thank Goodness!) When I phoned to make an appointment for one of them, I was told in no uncertain terms (and may I add without a shred of customer service :ph34r: ) that he does not accept new patients. My (idiotic?) assumption that the kids would be included in the family part was met by a dismissive snort and an order to make an appointment for myself and come in and ask his permission to bring the kid. No phonecalls allowed - take it or leave it....

Needless to say, without any choice in the matter I did just that - he looked at me funny when I told him why I'm there, apologised for the "misunderstanding" and told me to make an appointment for any of the kids whenever needed. Back at the reception counter, I attempt to do just that, and came really close to being yelled at by the office manager and told again that he does not accept new patients....I'll leave out the sordid details of the next three minutes - suffice to say that she stormed out in a huff with a promise/threat? to "talk to the dr. about this" and I left with appointment for one kid and both added onto the file...

Two questions - will MSP be billed for the 5 minutes I spend chatting with him - what would the billing code for that be?

Secondly, where do they find these female dragons that guard the office with their lives and absolute disregard for the fact that she is actually suppose to deliver some sort of customer service??? :o

Edited by patche

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CharleneK

The receptionist was definitely out of line; it remains a rule of thumb for GPs that if you see one member of a family, you see them all (that's why it's called "Family Practice"...) And if the GP is ethical, he should not bill MSP for a "getting to know you" visit.

Charlene

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patche

Thanks...thought so too - wasn't sure if it's just my ESL "mis"understanding of the family part... :ph34r: He's a great guy, so I don't think he'll bill for that - on the other hand, the office manager sounds like she rules the place with an iron fist, so she might whack him on the head if he doesn't.....

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Merv

It sickens me how (SOME) Doctor's receptionists think they are something special just because they work for a Doctor.My family doctor's front office staff are like that, they think their sh..t don't stink. Pure witches.

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Guest
It sickens me how (SOME) Doctor's receptionists think they are something special just because they work for a Doctor.My family doctor's front office staff are like that, they think their sh..t don't stink. Pure witches.

Merv not uncommon in South Africa either. The way they carry on and throw their weight makes you think they studied for the medical degree. I don’t take that BS and put them in their place. This is a typical reaction from somebody that is nobody. As they say in life you earn respect, to hell with them and their attitude.

:ph34r: Regards,

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Karen

When I first came to Canada , the receptionist at the doctors' office I went to, was so rude, that she would slam the phone down on me, claiming not 'understand' my accent! After taking her abuse a few times, I wrote a letter to the doctor who owns the practice, complaining about her. Thanks goodness, she vanished shortly thereafter, and the remaining receptionists became far more pleasant and accomodating.

Now, when medical receptionists are rude to me, I give then back as good as they dish out. I see no need to take their BS or cower to them. Without patients, they would not have a job, anyway.

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