Guest Barbara

I was told at work: "Immigrant go home"

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Alwyn

In most countries people reckon that foreigners are there because their country is better than that of the foreigner or due to some benefit.

In South-Africa, locals reckon, "What on Earth are you doing here?"

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johankok
In most countries people reckon that foreigners are there because their country is better than that of the foreigner or due to some benefit.

In South-Africa, locals reckon, "What on Earth are you doing here?"

;) I asked the similar to a Swiss women whom is looking for work in SA. :)

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cbc

The old racism chestnut. :) That one gets thrown around all over the world, not just in Canada. Two important things to remember:

  1. Race and tribe are significant social markers all over the African continent. Racial discrimination and racial tension is not limited to South Africa, white South Africans or Afrikaners. I pulled these examples from Wikipedia, so it's not exactly top secret:
    • On 5 July 1960, five days after the Congo gained independence from Belgium, the Force Publique garrison near Léopoldville mutinied against its white officers and attacked numerous European targets. This caused the fear amongst the approximately 100,000 whites still resident in the Congo and led to their mass exodus from the country.
    • Idi Amin's regime forced the expulsion in 1972 of Uganda's entire ethnic Asian population, mostly of Indian descent.
    • The 1994 massacres of nearly 1,000,000 Tutsis by Hutus, known as the Rwandan Genocide.
    • In 2003, Sinafasi Makelo, a representative of Mbuti Pygmies, told the UN's Indigenous People's Forum that during the Congo Civil War, his people were hunted down and eaten as though they were game animals. Both sides of the war regarded them as "subhuman" and some say their flesh can confer magical powers. Makelo asked the UN Security Council to recognise cannibalism as a crime against humanity and an act of genocide.
    • Since the mid-1990s the central government of Botswana has been trying to move Bushmen out of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve. As of October 2005, the government has resumed its policy of forcing all Bushmen off their lands in the Game Reserve, using armed police and threats of violence or death. Many of the involuntarily displaced Bushmen live in squalid resettlement camps and some have resorted to prostitution and alcoholism, while about 250 others remain or have surreptitiously returned to the Kalahari to resume their independent lifestyle. "How can we continue to have Stone Age creatures in an age of computers?" asked Botswana’s president Festus Mogae.
    • Attacks by the Janjaweed, militias of Sudan on the African population of Darfur, a region of western Sudan. A 14 July 2007 article notes that in the past two months up to 75,000 Arabs from Chad and Niger crossed the border into Darfur. Most have been relocated by the Sudanese government to former villages of displaced non-Arab people. Some 2.5 million have now been forced to flee their homes after attacks by Sudanese troops and Janjaweed militia.
    • In October 2006, Niger announced that it would deport the Arabs living in the Diffa region of eastern Niger to Chad. This population numbered about 150,000. While the government was rounding Arabs in preparation for the deportation, two girls died, reportedly after fleeing government forces, and three women suffered miscarriages. Niger's government had eventually suspended a controversial decision to deport Arabs.
    • South Africa Ethnic Cleansing erupted on 11 May 2008 within three weeks 80 000 were displaced the death toll was 62, with 670 injured by the violence when South Africans ejected non-nationals in a nationwide ethnic cleansing/xenophobic outburst. The most affected foreigners have been Somalis, Ethiopians, Indians, Pakistanis, Zimbabweans and Mozambiqueans. Local South Africans have also been caught up in the violence. Refugee camps a mistake Arvin Gupta, a senior UNHCR protection officer, said the UNHCR did not agree with the City of Cape Town that those displaced by the violence should be held at camps across the city.

(Yet, at the same time it must be noted that racial tension is not limited to Africa. It happens all over the world.)

[*]Unless this person was a member of the First Nations, he (or someone not to high up in his family tree) was an immigrant too, because pretty much everyone in Canada is an immigrant. He also isn't any less of an immigrant because his family arrived here before yours did.

Edited by cbc

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Inamarie
Unless this person was a member of the First Nations, he (or someone not to high up in his family tree) was an immigrant too, because pretty much everyone in Canada is an immigrant. He also isn't any less of an immigrant because his family arrived here before yours did.

Modern historians believe that Aboriginals arrived from Asia 30 000 years ago by way of a land bridge between Siberia and Alaska. Some of them settled in Canada, while others chose to continue to the south. When the European explorers arrived, Canada was populated by a diverse range of Aboriginal peoples who, depending on the environment, lived nomadic or settled lifestyles, were hunters, fishermen, or farmers.http://www.craigmarlatt.com/canada/history&people/aboriginals.html

I think everyone is an Immigrant from somewhere

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Markus

This thread is rather dated, but the topic remains relevant, especially given the prevailing economic conditions. For the record, I have never been directly confronted with any racial or xenophobic remarks, but I have been in attendance at many discussions surrounding immigration.

My take is that you have to contextualise the remarks. If they are remarks specifically aimed at you, of course, you have to deal with it. If they are general comments, made for whatever reason (which are the ones I have been privy to), usually I will engage the person to find out what the problem is. Sometimes it is the changing face of Canada that bothers the person, and here I simply empathise. If it is employment opportunities, usually I go to pains to explain that immigrants are not taking the high paying jobs, but it is the jobs Canadians don't want to do, that allow immigrants to get a foothold.

As regards the "Koos in Kanada" observation, this is true. Many Canadians feel they can drop their guard in front of South Africans. I don't go around brow beating them for this; I fully endorse peoples right to freedom of speech, so if I am offended, rather than shut down the discussion, I engage them.

Too often what is said publically is not a reflection of what the person is about. It takes a long time for Canadians to open up, especially in front of their own countrymen. I prefer to let them be comfortable enough to say anything in front of me. Not only do you get to experience the real perosn, but you also get to see their prejudices.

In closing, for the most part I have found Canadians to be very accepting of me, whether this is real or not only time will tell. Prejudice is usually more subtle; it is usually in the form of arrogance, a bad attitude or bad service. A direct approach, sticking to the facts, usually gets you around that one. In the beginning we are way too polite and tolerant. Over time we adjust, and we feed back bad service or behaviour. Given that Canadians are generally not confrontational, this usually sorts out any problems.

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Celestee

Yor as we Say it in SA " Tata Ma Chance " .............

But i feel for you Barbara and would hate to be in your position however its not any different in Souht africa to date i mean sa Is always labeled as Racist ect were its black on White however im an Indian and i was told to get back to india hahahhahahaha i mean come on my ancestors have been here for 150 documented years not forgeting the 200 years that have not been recorded .

So be strong stand your ground know your rights remember how hard it was to get there and dont let some ignorant kid break your spirit for real ....

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Tracey22

At lunch the other day, there were 6 of us in the office kitchen eating. We noted the following:

2 were ex-South Africans

1 was from ecuador,

1 from Pakistan

1 is a canadian born to Chinese immigrants

1 was canadian 3rd generation.

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Jules

The original post is the result of encountering a very rare person: a bigoted redneck Canadian. They do exist but are rather elusive. Just demonstrates that good and bad exists everywhere. Fortunately it's far more good than bad here.

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canuck nick

Yes, considering you will work in an office where at least 50% of the staff are immigrants. In my last office, 2 from SA, 2 from Hong Kong, 1 from Mexico, 1 from Burma, 1 from Korea, 1 from Phillipines and 6 from Canada.

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Sav
On ‎2006‎/‎11‎/‎17 at 1:53 AM, Guest Barbara said:

I put in a written complaint today and he was gone by 10 am.

Thanks for the good advice. He lasted just over 24 hours at the company.

WOW!! Am so pleased. Well done!!

 

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JanSalJanNat

This is a really old topic but I found it super interesting.  I must say, I did not expect this kind of behaviour in Canada & I am glad I picked up on the discussion so that I don't go into this naive.

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